Buenos Aires – January 2020 – In This City Art Nouveau Is Looking Up

In the early part of the 1900s Buenos Aires had plenty of money, as it served as the meat and grain market for much of Europe. As a result there are many grand buildings from that era throughout the city, including numerous in the Art Nouveau style.

Much of the ornamentation of these buildings are on the upper floors, so when we went on a tour with the Art Nouveau club we spent much of the morning looking up – as did everyone who was walking by on the sidewalks.

Our tour met at the very cool Savoy Hotel on Callao. Before we started down the street we checked out the interior – including the bar (which was closed at the time!)





Across the street from the Savoy is a Louis Duboise classic apartment building. Duboise is considered one of the fathers of the movement in Buenos Aires.






The corner of Callao and Mitre have examples on all 4 corners.










Just down the street is the Palacio del Congresso Nacional Argentino, aka – The National Congress Building. While not Art Nouveau, it none the less has a lot of interesting detail.








The tour continued down Rivadavia.














The building at Rivadavia 2009 has a glass dome with more than 950 pieces of mirrored glass. In addition the terrace has iron replicas of the Dragon Gate in Barcelona.















Rivadavia has a number of great buildings.









Even some of the garages in this area are designed in the style.






On Hipolito Yrigoyen are two amazing buildings directly across from each other. At 2562 is Casa Calise, the work of Viginio Colombo.

With numerous statues from Ercole Pasina, it looks like a palace, but since it’s completion in 1911 it has always been an apartment building.





While across the street is another Colombo apartment building with amazing style.









As we returned to Rivadavia the area became far more commercial however there are still some Art Nouveau examples that have survived.





Once Train Station anchors the neighborhood. Built in the Renaissance style in the 1890s, it continues to serve tens of thousands of commuters each day.





We headed over to Corrientes for our final stops, passing by this classic Bank of Argentina building.





Our final stop is Abasto. For nearly 100 years buildings on this site, including this one, served as the main produce market for the city.

Today it is a shopping mall.




But an amazing architectural mall. The Art Nouveau tour was operated by the Art Nouveau Club of Buenos Aires – it was well done and thorough, showing us many places we likely would’ve never seen in the city.








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