Buenos Aires – January 2020 – A More Detailed Visit to the Palace of Running Water

Early in our time in Buenos Aires I made a stop, and a posting, on the Palacio de Aqua Corrientes – the Palace of Running Water. This time we get a more in depth look at the building, and what it contains.

The exterior is of course amazing. Comprised of over 300,000 terra cotta tiles from Royal Doulton, it is the best looking building in the city.





































While it still functions as a pumping and water storage station, as well as an office for the water company, it has a nice museum.





















We caught up to a tour that was going to the library, crossing this great tile floor.









A large area off of the main water museum had an art exhibit from recycled materials.














From this space we had a view of the interior sections.






Including the giant water storage tanks.






The Palacio de Aqua Corrients – one amazing place.








Tigre, Argentina – January 2020 – Living in the Delta

One of the most hyped tourist activities in the area is to take a boat out through the delta from Tigre. We had a chance on a Sunday afternoon, taking one of the small wooden boats.

I was expecting to see a large expanse of nature but instead we passed by kilometers of dwellings – some shacks, some palacios.
























































































Buenos Aires – January 2020 – Saturday Wanderings

A Saturday in the city with some random sights.

As usual, we arrived at Retiro Train Station. Today however I noticed that on the side where the long distance trains leave from there is a series of murals.




















There are a number of these vintage platform kiosks scattered about the station.






Moving on we passed by one of the colorful buses, commonly known as Collectivos – private bus companies, In the background is the National Congress Building.






Our final barrio was Puerto Madero. Once docklands, then vacant for 40+ years, it is now the newest neighborhood in the city – with the tallest buildings.









The ship ARA Uruguay is a floating museum. It is thought to be the largest ship of it’s era still afloat – more than 140 years old having been built in 1874.























A first for me – a monument to taxi drivers.






The promenade goes along what was once the riverfront. It has been reclaimed and is now a nature preserve.





There are a number of food trucks along the way, but none served cerveza. Fear not – the mobile bar is ready for you!





The area is known as Costanera Sur.





With your back to the city it feels as though you are in the middle of the tropics.







Buenos Aires – January 2020 – In This City Art Nouveau Is Looking Up

In the early part of the 1900s Buenos Aires had plenty of money, as it served as the meat and grain market for much of Europe. As a result there are many grand buildings from that era throughout the city, including numerous in the Art Nouveau style.

Much of the ornamentation of these buildings are on the upper floors, so when we went on a tour with the Art Nouveau club we spent much of the morning looking up – as did everyone who was walking by on the sidewalks.

Our tour met at the very cool Savoy Hotel on Callao. Before we started down the street we checked out the interior – including the bar (which was closed at the time!)





Across the street from the Savoy is a Louis Duboise classic apartment building. Duboise is considered one of the fathers of the movement in Buenos Aires.






The corner of Callao and Mitre have examples on all 4 corners.










Just down the street is the Palacio del Congresso Nacional Argentino, aka – The National Congress Building. While not Art Nouveau, it none the less has a lot of interesting detail.








The tour continued down Rivadavia.














The building at Rivadavia 2009 has a glass dome with more than 950 pieces of mirrored glass. In addition the terrace has iron replicas of the Dragon Gate in Barcelona.















Rivadavia has a number of great buildings.









Even some of the garages in this area are designed in the style.






On Hipolito Yrigoyen are two amazing buildings directly across from each other. At 2562 is Casa Calise, the work of Viginio Colombo.

With numerous statues from Ercole Pasina, it looks like a palace, but since it’s completion in 1911 it has always been an apartment building.





While across the street is another Colombo apartment building with amazing style.









As we returned to Rivadavia the area became far more commercial however there are still some Art Nouveau examples that have survived.





Once Train Station anchors the neighborhood. Built in the Renaissance style in the 1890s, it continues to serve tens of thousands of commuters each day.





We headed over to Corrientes for our final stops, passing by this classic Bank of Argentina building.





Our final stop is Abasto. For nearly 100 years buildings on this site, including this one, served as the main produce market for the city.

Today it is a shopping mall.




But an amazing architectural mall. The Art Nouveau tour was operated by the Art Nouveau Club of Buenos Aires – it was well done and thorough, showing us many places we likely would’ve never seen in the city.








Colonia, Uruguay – January 2020 – The Old Cars of Colonia

Before our trip to Colonia I had read often that there were a number of old cars running around town. I went with the expectation it was a ‘mini Havana’, in reality there were few old cars and trucks, and most of those were parked in front of restaurants as advertising.

Still those that were there, including a number of VW Beetles, coupled with the street scenes, provided good photo ops.

We start however with one of the ‘fast ferries’ from Buenos Aires. These ferries can go up to 60 MPH.

























































































With the tourist industry there were numerous places that rented golf carts and scooters, though most were not as cool as this one.





And with that we are headed on the ferry back to Buenos Aires – with the buildings of the city visible in the distance from 30 miles away.








Colonia, Uruguay – January 2020 – A Historic Town

The town of Colonia del Sacramento was founded in 1680 by the Portuguese in what was then a southern territory of Brazil. Over the next 140 years it changed hands numerous times between the Portuguese and the Spanish, always remaining an important port.










The historic district is designated by UNESCO as a World Site. Many of the cobblestone streets date from the 17th an 18th century.

The buildings, while not as old, are still very historic.




















The Basilica dates from the early 1800s.





Nearby are the foundations of the buildings from the 1600s.





After visiting the church we continued our tour of the old town.













The lighthouse is situated next to a 17th century convent remains.











































Portions of the original city wall remain, having been restored.





We ended our walk around town crossing through the gate that lead originally to a drawbridge.