Buenos Aires – January 2020 – A More Detailed Visit to the Palace of Running Water

Early in our time in Buenos Aires I made a stop, and a posting, on the Palacio de Aqua Corrientes – the Palace of Running Water. This time we get a more in depth look at the building, and what it contains.

The exterior is of course amazing. Comprised of over 300,000 terra cotta tiles from Royal Doulton, it is the best looking building in the city.





































While it still functions as a pumping and water storage station, as well as an office for the water company, it has a nice museum.





















We caught up to a tour that was going to the library, crossing this great tile floor.









A large area off of the main water museum had an art exhibit from recycled materials.














From this space we had a view of the interior sections.






Including the giant water storage tanks.






The Palacio de Aqua Corrients – one amazing place.








Favorites of 2019

A great year of sights – these are my favorite 30 photos of 2019, with brief explanations why they are my favorites.

Chicago – Willis (Sears) Tower. The perspective of people out of their elements.





Washington – The former Capital Columns in the Arboretum. The morning lighting with the wildflowers and contrast of the columns.





Washington – Embassy Open House Day – and a young lady’s perfect timing next to their logo.





Near Frankfurt, Kentucky – I have a thing about old, seemingly abandoned buildings. This however had been reclaimed and re-used for it’s original purpose – bourbon storage and aging.





New Orleans – Mardis Gras World. It was like stepping into some psychedelic movie.





Avery Island, Louisiana – The symmetry of the rice fields with another old building.





Houston – The home of quirky art. This is from Lucky Land, a very cool place.





Houston quirky art part 2 – Giant President Heads.





San Antonio mission. Symmetry and historic architecture.





Amarillo, Texas – Cadillac Ranch, but after a storm where they appeared to be in a pond.





Columbus Zoo and a zoom lens. The statement in the face and amazing beauty of the animals.









Montreal – Ferris Wheel in Old Montreal – Perfect timing and lighting (just lucky on the timing).





Marietta, Ohio – Sternwheeler festival.





Chicago – Open House and another fantastic ceiling/light.





Buenos Aires – obviously the extended period spent in Argentina has opened a new world of photo possibilities. Recoleta Cemetery is the most popular tourist spot in the city, and I had the good fortune of some young lady there for (I suspect) a photo shoot when she ran by the row I was in, turned and posed for me! Who doesn’t want a photo of a young lady running through a cemetery with a knife.




Recoleta Cemetery provides so many great shots – the cob webs are natural, not staged.




The tomb of San Martin.





The La Boca neighborhood is known as a working class neighborhood in love with their team – La Boca juniors. The old car symbolizes the working class neighborhood and it was parked in front of the soccer practice fields with their bright colors on the walls.






Chacarita Cemetery is not as famous as Recoleta, but still a very stunning place.





The sunrises and sunsets can be amazing.









An hour drive out of town to San Antonio de Areco, and their gaucho festival was the event of the year. 4000 people and horses dressed for the occasion.





The Jacaranda trees are fantastic in bloom.






On a walking tour of street art the passer by’s sometimes fit the theme.






The Casa Rosada. A great courtyard and a bemused guard.










Hockey in Argentina – bring that soccer passion inside and combine it with hockey.





Finally – Bariloche, a beautiful mountain and lakes region.





Buenos Aires – December 2019 – Club Atletico River Plate

One of the two most popular soccer teams in Buenos Aires is River Plate. It’s name comes from the era of the construction of the Port of Buenos Aires, when the workers disappeared to play soccer, the boxes they were unloading said the English name for Rio de La Plata – River Plate – and the name stuck.

Their stadium, and museum, is located in the Nunez section of the city.




The team’s logo has been fairly consistent in the 115 years of their existence.





As has their jersey’s.












They are one of the most successful teams, including a recent Libertadores Cup winner.

























The museum has a list of all of the players who ever played for the team listed on the walls.





The museum also has replicas of their stadiums over the years, including the current one.









We went outside with a group for a tour of the real thing.





Including more trophies.





The initials stand for Club Atletico River Plate – CARP!





The stadium is officially known as Monumental Antonio Vespucio Liberti, or El Monumental. At 70,000 seats it is the largest in Argentina, and home to the Argentina national team as well as River.













While Argentina has banned visiting fans from stadiums, the section they used to use is penned off in the upper deck.




It is very close to Aeroparque Jorge Newberry, giving it a ‘Shea Stadium’ feel.





Outside is a massive statue of a soccer player.





The tour guide was informative to most, and helpful to us translating some of the Spanish to English as we walked from stop to stop. Some though were apparently there to keep their husbands happy.





River Plate – In Buenos Aires they are either loved or hated, nothing in between.







Buenos Aires – December 2019 – D Line Subway Art

Christmas day morning is the perfect time to take photos of the massive amount of art in the Buenos Aires subway – the trains are running frequently but there are very few people on them, or in the stations.

This posting is not meant to be a catalog of all of the art as it would be far to extensive, rather to profile some of the best. The photos go in order from the furthest station out (Congresso de Tucaman) to the termination at Catedral. Many of the notes detailing the work came from a PDF/book published in 2017 by the city of Buenos Aires.

We start in the Congresso de Tucaman station with a large mural that is meant as a statement of freedom and independence, with a number of symbols including a condor which stands for the southern hemisphere and an eagle which stands for the northern hemisphere. This mural also represents sacred symbols and the idea that it is never too late to make dreams come true.




This mural, as well as a number of others, in the Jose Hernandez station is by Raúl Soldi. The works depict a bygone era of art and music.




The ticket level has a tribute to Lionel Messi, a legendary Argentine soccer player.




In the Palermo station are works from Milo Lockett, evoking childhood memories to provide a pleasant journey.







In the Plaza d’Italia station are three beautiful tile murals by Leonie Matthis de Villar. This one is depicting public ceremonies the chiefs used to carry out with the priest before entering the church.




The columns of the station are decorated by Marino Santa Maria, the mosaic artist we met in his studio a few weeks ago.




On the floor of the platform, protected by special resistant material, are scenes from the Port of Buenos Aires in the 1930s. It represents the Italian immigrant laborers of the day.









Many of the stations have these fantastic murals on tile. Completed by Rodolfo Franco, they were installed in the stations during their construction in the 1930s, depicting both historic and current (for 1930s) life across Argentina.

























In the Pueyrredón station are a series of illustrations by Gustavo Reinoso showing the symbols of the city in a Pop Art style.














Further into town at the Facultad de Medicina we return to more of the Franco murals.













In the Callao station there are 8 large mosaics portraying German artists who learned their artwork was destroyed by the Nazi’s at the end of World War II. Completed by Remo Bianchedi, it is a tribute to the anguish those artists felt.

Knowing this now they seem cheapened by the large advertising nearby.













The Teatro Colon station has a far more modern art approach.






Also in the Teatro Colon station are representations of the Spanish conquistadors coming to Argentina, and the impact it had on the natives.






In this mural depicting 1835, gauchos are resting after the end of their journey, leaving their carts half-loaded. This image contains those goods that were part of the international trade that later Argentina into the breadbasket of the world.





We end at Catedral where the beloved Mafalda is lamenting the condition of the world.







Buenos Aires – December 2019 – Belgrano Barrio

Today’s tour is of the Belgrano neighborhood. Belgrano was originally a town of it’s own, but it became part of the city of Buenos Aires in 1887.

Today it is one of the nicer neighborhoods in the city.




There is a small, but lively Chinatown in the neighborhood.










There is a Buddhist Temple in an otherwise nondescript building.




The Parque Barrancas de Belgrano covers a 3 block area, including some magnificent trees.







A large gazebo known as La Glorieta, where numerous dances occur on a weekly basis.





Amazingly a Statue of Liberty that is older than the one in New York, albeit much smaller.




A mosaic on an apartment building.




Manuel Belgrano




The Immaculate Conception Church.










The Museo Historico Sarmiento.










And another beautiful sunset ends our great weekend.