Hamilton, OH – August 2017 – Remote Control Airplane ‘Flying Circus’

The Cincinnati Remote Control Airplane Club has been around for over 50 years. Once a year they host a ‘Flying Circus’ at the Butler County Airport in Hamilton, Ohio. This event allows them to showcase to the public their love of their airplanes, as well as their skill in flying them.

There were a number of models both in scope of the time of aviation design as well as scale.

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One of the highlights was an event to break balloons by flying low and fast and clipping them with (hopefully) their wheels. Not all used their wheels.

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A few slammed into the display holding the balloons.

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Some of the landings made it but a bit off course.

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The pilots went to pick up the remains of those that crashed.

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A Wright Flyer model was flown, albeit very briefly before crashing.

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The models were amazing in detail – from a distance it is tough to tell they are models.

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The coordinator had a great hat.

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A model Valkyrie deloyed a chute to slow it down when landing.

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Some of the landings were dicey, but made it.

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A trio of Red Baron bi-planes put on a great show.

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Some model jets made an appearance.

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Another close landing.

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In the end it was a great show.

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Springfield, OH – July 2017 – Airplane Barnstorming Festival

The Springfield, Ohio airport hosted a ‘Barmstorming Festival’, celebrating vintage aircraft. Open to the public there were aircraft from the 1910s through the 1970s on display, with their owners more than happy to tell you about their planes.

 

There were a number of bi-planes.

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A WWI vintage plane.

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They lined both sides of the taxiway.

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Who flies with 3 instruments and a leather helmet?

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Some great piston engines.

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The paint jobs were outstanding on all of the airplanes.

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The Springfield Municipal Airport was the host.

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What a way to refuel your plane, stand on top to reach the upper wing where the fuel tank is.

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In addition to the planes there were a few vintage trucks.

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And they flew off into the sunset.

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Dayton – January 2017 – Air Force Museum Hangar 4

The USAF Air Force Museum was advertising a robotics event, and since they had opened Hangar 4, the Presidential Plane hangar, since the last time we had been there we made the trip out. Hangar 4 also has a large display of spacecraft.

While we saw very little robotics, the new hangar is spectacular, and well worth the trip. We also cruised through the other hangars, which hadn’t changed much. The USAF Museum does a great job in their presentation, I think better than the Smithsonian.

 

Lockheed Constellation – First Airplane to be called Air Force One, primarily for Dwight Eisenhower

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Boeing 707 – SAM 26000 – Used by Kennedy, Johnson and Nixon

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Outer Banks, North Carolina – Late Fall 2016 Road Trip – Day 6

We were once again up before dawn, where we had an interesting site from our 12th floor room overlooking the bay. You could see the lights of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge with gaps in the lights where they drop down into the tunnels.

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As we left the Tidewater area in the morning we drove through Virginia Beach, stopping at the Naval Aviation Memorial and briefly looked at the boardwalk. There are actually three bronze statues here with the intent to show three eras of naval aviation, starting in the early 20th century, progressing to World War II and then to modern times.

The first statue is of Eugene Ely, who was the first aviator to fly off a ship’s deck. Next, is a WWII pilot and his crewmen who are leaving their hatch. Finally, there are two modern-day pilots, a maintenance man, and a woman with her foot on an empty cart. The memorial is tucked between hotels on the boardwalk near the ocean.

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Monster trucks, anyone?  Well then Poplar Branch, North Carolina on Caratoke Highway is the place. This is the home of Grave Digger, supposedly the most famous monster truck. Its wheels are at least three feet high and the truck is painted with a gray ghost and haunted house on it. The monster truck stood upright on its front tires with raised rear tires at the front of the property.

Here is where anyone can check out these giant trucks up close and buy a souvenir at its gift shop. The establishment named Digger’s Dungeon offers rides to visitors and sells Diggers merchandise. A number of monster trucks were scattered on the property and I made the most of it taking photos.

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The Wright Brothers National Memorial, located in Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina, commemorates the first successful, sustained, powered flights in a heavier-than-air machine. From 1900 to 1903, Wilbur and Orville Wright came here from Dayton, Ohio, based on information from the U.S. Weather Bureau about the area’s steady winds and privacy. We took the sidewalk up the dune reading small signs warning of cacti in the grass. Thorns of the cacti are harmful to people and pets; but Bermuda grass was planted on the dune to stabilize it.  The tall monument had carved stone heads of Orville and Wilbur Wright and an inscription dedicated to the Wright brothers genius, perseverance and risk.

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A 60-foot granite monument, dedicated in 1932, is perched atop 90-foot-tall Kill Devil Hill, commemorating the achievement of the Wright brothers. They conducted many of their glider tests on the massive shifting dune that was later stabilized to form Kill Devil Hill. Inscribed in capital letters along the base of the memorial tower is the phrase “In commemoration of the conquest of the air by the brothers Wilbur and Orville Wright conceived by genius achieved by dauntless resolution and unconquerable faith.”

Atop the tower is a marine beacon, similar to one found in a lighthouse. The monument was erected by Congress in 1932. In the end, 1,200 tons of granite, more than 2,000 tons of gravel, more than 800 tons of sand and almost 400 tons of cement were used to build the structure, along with numerous other materials.

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Beyond the dune stands a bronze sculpture of the bi-wing plane, Orville, Wilbur, the First Safety Security Team and photographers, a tribute to those who participated in the first flight. The First Safety Security Team is now known at the U.S. Coast Guard and the sculpture captures the historic first flight by the Wright Brothers and their witnesses.

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A park ranger informed us at the test site that the Wright Brothers made four flights from level ground near the base of the hill following three years of gliding experiments from atop nearby sand dunes. On December 17, 1903 the brothers made four flights. A white blanket hung on the hangar door alerting the First Safety Security Team that the brothers needed help to move the plane onto the launch rail and were ready to fly.

A bit of history notes that John Glenn, another Ohioan took a small piece of this white blanket with him in his historic moment into space.  Another interesting fact is that a man of the Wright Brother’s team who witnessed their first flight also witnessed the first landing on the moon in July, 1969, an accomplishment within less than a century.

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The park ranger went on to say that at 10:35 a.m. on December 17, 1903 with a 27 mph wind, Orville released a wire that held the flying machine to the track, and the contraption chugged slowly forward into the stiff wind. Wilbur trotted alongside, holding the wing to keep the flyer level. Then the flying machine lifted off the track, and Wilbur let go. The flyer left the ground as John Daniels squeezed the shutter bulb on the camera to capture a black-and-white photograph that will be forever engraved in human history.

Flight 1 flown by Orville lifted 12 seconds and went 60 feet into the air for a length of 120 feet. Flight 2 flown by Wilbur lifted 40 feet at the launch rail and flew 12 seconds for 175 feet. Flight 3 commanded by Orville flew 26 seconds for 200 feet. Around noon, Wilbur made a flight of 852 feet that lasted 59 seconds—the longest of the day but the flying machine was slightly damaged by Wilbur’s landing, and the group hauled it back to the hangar for repairs.

We walked along the actual routes of the four flights, with small monuments marking their four finishes. The original launch rail is still there. Two wooden sheds at the test site, based on historic photographs, were recreated as the world’s first airplane hangar and the brothers’ living quarters.

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The visitor center in its modern design at Kitty Hawk is home to a museum featuring models and actual tools and machines used by the Wright brothers during their flight experiments including a reproduction of the wind tunnel used to test wing shapes and a portion of the engine used in the first flight.

We saw articles of the history of flight and the patch of the white blanket that John Glenn took with him on his orbit of the earth.  A life-size replica of the Wright brothers’ 1903 Flyer was there. The 1903 Flyer is the first powered aircraft in history to achieve controlled flight (the original is displayed at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington D.C.).  A full-scale model of the Brothers’ 1902 glider is also present, having been constructed under the direction of Orville Wright himself.

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Lunch found us at Rooster’s Southern Kitchen, for some vinegary BBQ sandwich and chicken and dumplings. Now nourished, we we headed off to Jockey’s Ridge State Park.

Jockey’s Ridge State Park located in Nags Head, North Carolina includes the tallest active sand dune system in the eastern United States. The tall dune area of Jockey’s Ridge is known as a medano—a massive, shifting hill of sand lacking vegetation. Scientists estimate that there are 30 million tons of sand in the park.

The sand dunes now have eight ponds scattered in the sand from Hurricane Matthew that blew through but have not dried yet. The ponds are not uncommon, often when it rains; water collects near the bottom of the dunes creating temporary ponds known as vernal pools.

A forest of trees lined the edge of the pool. This maritime forest is the home to most plant and animal life in the park. The forest help to stabilize the dune and in return the dune protects the forest from strong winds and harsh salt spray.

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We hiked through sand as we did thirty years earlier, when we were last here. From the top of the sand dune, we could see the ocean and the bay. Hiking through sand is difficult; it seems like you take one step forward and two steps back but we made it to the top of the next dune where boys were rolling down the side of the dune. We trudged through the sand making our way around the vernal pool until we got back to the Visitor Center.

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Our return trip to the hotel was along the road next to the ocean until we reached construction blocking our way to our hotel, the Hilton Garden Inn at Kitty Hawk. We managed to maneuver around it, so after check-in, we went out to explore the Outer Banks by car.

We traveled a bit up to the time of a traffic jam that blocked our way. The jam was caused by a tow motor loaded with lumber partially jutted into the roadway. The police stopped traffic in both directions due to the construction while we waited at least fifteen minutes. So we turned the car around and went into the town of Duck to shop for something to do. Later in Kitty Hawk, we bought a kite, a sweatshirt, and a t-shirt.

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The Kitty Hawk Pier is behind our hotel where we hung out to find two surfers on the waves. We walked on the beach as the tide ebbed although at times the waves chased us close to the protective dune that separated the beach from the beach homes. It was nice as we walked in the cool, cloudy, and drizzly weather, we collected some interesting seashells.

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We are in North Carolina, right, so time for more BBQ. The High Cotton BBQ restaurant was across the street from our hotel so we skipped over there for dinner, it was excellent.

New Carlisle, OH – October 2016 – Festival of Flight

The first Saturday in October found us in the small western Ohio town of New Carlisle, for their Festival of Flight. Unlike most events that feature airplanes that are held at airports, this one went down Main Street.

Before we made it to Main Street we did stop by the local airport where the planes were arriving and being parked in a field. Once it was time for the parade to start they hooked up the little airplanes (Cessna’s and the like) to vintage tractors and off they went.

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We had made our way into town in plenty of time to find a good spot, and waited for the parade. We walked up and down the street and checked out the booths, most of which told typical country fare, quilts, Nascar t shirts, and a Trump booth. Despite being totally out of place with the local crowd, the event itself was totally worth the trip. Eventually we found a shady spot, and set the chairs down.

The parade began with a few local politicians and the local high school marching band, before the real fun began with the airplanes rolling down Main Street.

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Many of the little planes wingspan came right over us on the edge of the sidewalk.

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There was even an ultralight

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The parade continued for 30 minutes with a number of planes making an appearance.

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Just to keep with things out of place there were a number of boats on trailers with people in them that went by.

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A flying pig???

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Since we caught the parade at the beginning, and it essentially circled the middle of the town we were able to move around the corner and see the parade come back…

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Troy, OH – August 2016 – Waco Fly In

Our first Saturday back in Ohio found us back in Troy, Ohio at the Waco Airplane grounds again. This time it was for the annual Waco Fly In, a day that many owners of the Waco planes come to town to display their aircraft, as well as bond with the other aficionados of vintage airplanes.

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The weather forecast was predicting rain later in the day so we got an early start, arriving in Troy around 9:30 to find a field with  8 bi wing planes. You were welcome to wander the field and check them out closer, which we did.

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A few took off with passengers as a charity fundraiser, giving me further photo ops.

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The hanger had a static display with some interesting objects and a few toys. After an hour or so we had seen it all so we moved on.

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Nearby Piqua was scheduled to have a motorcycle show, and when we got there just before noon there were a few parked around, along with some booths set up down Main Street. We went into a little restaurant someone on the street recommended, the Lighthouse, which was typical small town heart attack fare, anything you like as long as it was fried, but the help was prompt and friendly.

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The rain kept most away, but a few custom bikes were on display and had an interesting look all wet. After a brief time we gave up and called it a day.

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Newfoundland – Late Summer 2016 Road Trip – Day 11 – Across the Province

New founKnowing we had a long drive today across Newfoundland to reach Gros Morne National Park at a reasonable time, we left the chic hotel for breakfast at McDonald’s. Although we got our usual McDonalds breakfast, we did notice lots of new choices offering a healthier menu than in the states. Egg on bagel, wraps, and a case of fresh pastries looked yummy. The locals with their Irish slanted accent greeted us a warm welcome and a good day as we left. Newfoundlanders like to talk and are very friendly.

On the way across Newfoundland we took a brief detour to see Dildo. Yes there is a town in Newfoundland called Dildo, which seems to have come upon hard times. Located on a picturesque inlet, there is not much there except the Needs Convenience Store, the Dildo Post Office and the Dildo Interpretive Centre, which was closed so it will remain a mystery what they interpret.

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Oh yes, apparently once a year they have the Dildo festival. Supposedly it was once used for a long fairly thin pin stuck in the edging of a row boat to act as a pivot for the oar. Regardless after about 10 minutes we had had enough and moved on.

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As we continued across Newfoundland we continued to be amazed at how much traffic there was for a province the size of California with less than a half of a million people. But the Trans Canada Highway (the TCH) was well built, with numerous third lanes for passing the trucks. We made a brief stop at Terra Nova National Park to stretch the legs and enjoy a beautiful overlook, complete with two Red Chairs, which are a Canadian tradition.

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Our next stop was in We drove to Gander, Newfoundland to see the Gander International Airport. Gander is well know as a stop off in the early days of aviation for flights going to and from Europe made a fuel stop here. While it is still an active airport, their famous international lounge has been closed off  from use, but still visible from an upper level overlook.

Decorated in the mid-century design that looks pristine yet today, complete with a 72-ft mural of people and birds representing hope, wealth, and peace was painted across the top portion of the wall. The blocks of colorful terrazzo floor spanned the large room. A wooden sculpture of a bird stood at one end of the room; supposedly kissing the top of the head of the bird gives you good luck.

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Gander is near the great circle route between U.S. East Coast cities and London. On September 11, 2001, with United States airspace closed due to the terrorist attacks, Gander International Airport played host to 38 airliners, totaling 6,122 passengers and 473 crew members. With not enough hotel and restaurants to accommodate the stranded flyers, Gander’s residents hospitably brought homemade bagged lunches to the flyers as they stepped off the plane and converted schools and large buildings for temporary shelters. Some residents offered their homes as additional lodgings when the public buildings were filled. To thank the town for its role in helping thousands of temporary transients in the wake of the attacks, New Yorkers gifted Gander with a piece of steel from the World Trade Center’s south tower.

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Finally we reached Gros Morne National Park on the western side of Newfoundland, where we had to go another 60 miles to get to our hotel in the town of Cow Head, giving us a preview of what we would see tomorrow. It is amazing to see the mountains and fjords, and realize you are on the east coast, not west coast.

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As we made our way north we stopped at a number of overlooks, as well as Lobster Head Cove, complete with a lighthouse.

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We paused for a time at an area where you could look back at Western Brook Pond, and the 2000′ high cliffs that line it. Unfortunately it was a few miles off in the distance, but I had made boat tour reservations for the next day to see it up close.

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Finally we arrived in Cow Head, and checked into our room at the Shallow Bay Motel, with our ocean view room – literally 5′ out our window. The motel also had a restaurant and theater.As you can imagine there aren’t many restaurants in some place called Cow Head, Newfoundland, so we had dinner at the hotel.

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