Newark, Ohio – August 2020 – Random Views of Licking County

Today’s tour is Licking County. The unusual name comes from the proliferation of ‘Salt Licks’ that were in the area when it was settled by Europeans. Salt Likes are a natural occurrence that wildlife used to gain critical minerals.

While many of the barn photos on earlier postings were dilapidated, but today’s is in excellent condition.

The small town of Granville is home to Denison University. It is a liberal arts college that attract students from out of state.

Swasey Chapel sits high on a hill above town.

Next door is Swasey Observatory. Apparently Swasey gave you both the virtual view of the heavens as well as the physical.

The Doane Administration building.

Newark is home to a number of large earthworks. The Hopewell Native Americans were prolific mound builders.

The photo below shows the Octagon Mound. In the early 1900s this area was sold to a group who built a golf course around the mounds.

The Ohio Historical Society owns the land now, and is in the process of evicting the golf course to return it to it’s original state.

The nearby Great Circle Earthworks is one of the largest in the world.

Interestingly it is restricted airspace so the drone wouldn’t go into the circle for a photo.

Newark is known as ‘Mound City’.

The area around the courthouse square has a number of historic buildings.

Lancaster, Ohio – August 2020 – Random Views of Fairfield County

The Random Views of Ohio Counties continues with Fairfield County. This county is the transition from suburban Columbus flatlands to southern Ohio rolling hills.

Rock Mill is a restored grain mill in a park, but with Covid it was closed.

It appears the field in the foreground was soybeans this year, but corn last year – with a few left overs regrowing. They look as though they have been left behind from the rest of the corn in the far field.

Random views of the countryside, most with an abstract approach.

The largest city is Lancaster. As you approach town from the east you pass the vintage Skyview Drive In Movie Theater. With the social distancing the drive in movies are making a comeback, but the Skyview has been there since 1948 (old photo is from their website)

Downtown Lancaster is comprised of almost all 100 year old buildings. This one has not only been well restored with ornate details, it has a couple of great ‘ghost signs’ on the side.

An old shoe factory is starting to come back to life.

The county fairground’s famed round barn.

Normally this time of year the fairgrounds is getting ready for the big event – the county fair. Not this year – just vacant grandstands.

Fairfield County has one of the largest collections of covered bridges in the country. This one is located on the community college grounds.

Marion, Ohio – August 2020 – Random Views of Marion County

This posting is the start of a series of Ohio County focused random views. Unintentionally many of Marion County’s turned out to be barns and other structures in various states of disrepair.

A right hand drive Rolls Royce.

The late summer provided many contrasting colors with the barns.

The corn is so high it felt like walls along the road.

Marion is a railroad town. The light off in the distance was an oncoming train, but is a couple of miles away.

Marion was home to President Harding.

They have built a new Presidential Library for Harding, showing that no matter how crooked you are you will eventually get a Presidential Library.

Virtual Travel – Iowa

In previously postings I have shown examples of the tremendous population growth many of the states have experienced over the last 50-60 years. Iowa is the opposite of that. In the mid 1950s there were 2.7 million people in the state, up only 500,000 from 1900. In the next 70 years the population has only grown another 500,000 people.

It is the heart of the cornbelt, as exhibited in this graphically impressive 1954 map.

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This scene could be from 1900, 1955 or 2020.

 

 

 

1957 – The graphics are still impressive with this view of factory and a highway.

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Des Moines 1957

Downtown Des Moines, 9th and Locust looking east, 1957. Locust Street was 2-way then. Equitable Bldg. is right of center, the current Suites of 800 Locust Hotel is just to the right. Note the diversity of shops. There is a Sherwin Williams paint store on the NW corner. This was before there was suburban shopping centers or strip malls.

 

2020 streetview of the same intersection. Despite minimal population growth the city has changed dramatically.

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1970 – Herbert Hoover Presidential Library. It was built and dedicated in 1962, not long before Hoover died in 1964.

1974 – Herbert Hoover’s 100th birthday.

Government State Iowa 1970.jpg

Government State Iowa 1974

 

Herbert Hoover is the only U.S. President that was born in Iowa. Hoover however is often ranked among the worst presidents in history, although everyone is up one now.

Hoover was born in the town of West Branch, Iowa in this small house.  (photo from Wikipedia)

 

 

 

1971 – A collage of scenes around the state. The scene in the lower left is the Pella Tulip Festival.

Government State Iowa 1971.jpg

 

The Pella Tulip Festival has taken place every year since 1935. Today the town plants 200,000 tulips in celebration.

 

 

 

1972 – Seasons in Iowa.

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1973 – Joliet and Marquette. The early explorers in Iowa (and elsewhere).

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1975 – State Symbols

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1976,  1979 & 1983 – Generic (read – boring) covers

Government State Iowa 1976.jpg       Government State Iowa 1979.jpg

Government State Iowa 1983.jpg

 

 

1986 – Another collage including riverboats.

Government State Iowa 1986.jpg

 

The eastern border of Iowa is the Mississippi River. There are a number of towns and cities along the river that have transitioned from commerce to tourism.

There are also riverboat casinos in Dubuque, Bettendorf and Clinton. (Photo from Travel Iowa).

Celebration River Cruises, Iowa

 

 

 

1988 – Another collage but in the form of a quilt.

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Des Moines each year holds ‘Quilt Week’. (Photo from Pintrest)

Community Outreach – Des Moines Area Quilter's Guild

 

 

1991 – The collages continue.

Government State Iowa 1991.jpg

Among the photos this year is the Iowa State Capitol. Built between 1871 and 1886, the building is the only 5 domed capitol in America. (Photo from All American Scaffolding website)

Iowa State Capital Scaffold Rental Project Overview

 

 

1994 – Snake Alley in Burlington.

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Iowa is well known for being mostly flat landscape. Along the Mississippi River however there are some bluffs, including the one in Burlington.

In 1894 they built a street up this bluff with multiple curves, giving it the name of ‘Snake Alley’ It rises 58′ (17.8m) in a distance of 275 feet for a 21% grade.

SnakeAlley BurlingtonIA.jpg

 

For perspective here is Canton Avenue in Pittsburgh, claimed to be one of the steepest streets in the world – rising at 37%. To Pittsburghers 21% is considered a level yard.

 

 

 

1995 – Pikes Peak State Park. What, I thought Pikes Peak was in Colorado?

While it does have a panoramic view, I think they are over advertising using that name.

Government State Iowa 1995.jpg

 

 

 

1996 & 1998 – The collage returns, this time with a butterfly each time.

Government State Iowa 1996.jpg      Government State Iowa 1998.jpg

In 2015 there was a push for the Regal Fritillary (this butterfly) to become the official state butterfly, but nothing came of it. These maps pre-date that effort by nearly 10 years!

 

 

1999 – 100th Anniversary of the first man carrying glider in Iowa

Government State Iowa 1999.jpg

As the map states in 1898 14 year old Carl Gates flew in this glider, pulled along by a horse. He later went on to attend the Armour Institute of Technology in Chicago, later building small airplanes.

The reverse side of the map has a tribute to transportation in Iowa over the years. From canoes to steamships to trains, Iowa has seen it all pass by.

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The Lincoln Highway was one of the first transcontinental roads, passing through Iowa on it’s way from New York to San Francisco. There is a very famous bridge in Iowa that celebrates this road. (Photo from Iowa Girl on the Go blog)

 

 

 

2001 – Collage again, including a covered bridge. Those that read this blog know I rarely offer negative commentary but once on a flight from Atlanta to LAX I attempted to watch Bridges of Madison County. This movie was set, and filmed in Iowa in 1995, and the bridge featured on this map.

To me that movie was so bad I wanted to jump out of the plane somewhere over Iowa, but to each their own.

Government State Iowa 2001.jpg

 

 

 

2002 – Collage (again) with crossings.

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In an attempt to find this rail trestle above I came across the High Trestle Trail. This rails to trails opened in 2011, crossing it’s namesake span over the Des Moines River.

I have only been to Iowa twice, and then very briefly, but this looks worth the trip (Photo from Wikipedia)

High Trestle Trail Bridge.jpg

 

 

 

2003 – Again the Bridges of Madison County bridge!

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2004 – Collage including a Railroad Museum.

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Among the railroad museums in Iowa is the Union Pacific Railroad Museum. Located in Council Bluffs, it details the history of this railroad. Located in a former library, the museum at times sponsors rides on this great train below to raise funds. (Photo Omaha newspaper)

Hundreds ride back in time on Union Pacific passenger train in ...

 

 

 

2005 – Collage including the Black Hawk Bridge spanning the Mississippi between Iowa and Wisconsin.

Government State Iowa 2005.jpg

 

An unusual cantilever through truss design, it was completed in 1931. There are plans to replace this bridge in the next 10 years or so. Personally I love these old bridges with their Erector Set gone wild look.

 

 

 

2008 – Collage including downhill skiing in Iowa.

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The Mount Crescent Ski Resort in Honey Lake, Iowa has a vertical drop of 250′! (Photo from Onthesnow.com)

Mt. Crescent IA Viewundefined

 

 

2009 – Collage including ‘Barn Quilts’. These decorations grace barns throughout the state.

Government State Iowa 2009.jpg

 

Sac County has enough of these Barn Quilts they have a tour. The tour can be found at

Barnquilts.com – where this photo came from.

 

 

2010 – The Bob Kerrey Pedestrian Bridge is a 3000′ long walkway across the Missouri River between downtown Omaha, Nebraska and Council Bluffs, Iowa.

Government State Iowa 2010.jpg

 

 

 

2011& 2013 – Additional visits to the Capitol.

Government State Iowa 2011.jpg      Government State Iowa 2013

 

 

 

2012 – Small Town Iowa.

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2014 – Great River Bridge at Burlington. As with many modern bridges this is cable stayed, however uniquely it is uneven – there are 13 pairs on one side and 14 on the other side.

Government State Iowa 2014.jpg

 

 

 

2015 – One last collage including hot air balloons.

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Each year the National Balloon Classic comes to Des Moines. For 9 days over 100 hot air balloons fill the skies over the city and surrounding countryside. (Photo from Radioiowa.com)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lexington, Kentucky – May 2019 – A Damp Quiet Morning at Keeneland

Keeneland Race Course is located just to the west of Lexington. It is known as one of the most beautiful facilities in the country.


Much like Claiborne Farms everything is done in an understated, but in a posh way.


The stables area are well kept, albeit somewhat quiet on this cool, damp morning.


There was some activity as the horses wait for no man.


At Keeneland the horses always have the right of way.


There is a practice track in addition to the main track.


Returning from the stable area we passed by the library.


A view of the main drive through the facility.


Most of the primary buildings are built from stone.


While this gate was closed, others were open. The styling keeps with the simple elegance.


I am not certain if a Rolex clock keeps better time, but it fits the environment.


The jockeys quarters near the main track.


The entrance to the paddock is closely guarded on race days.


Even the paddock has a nice stone wall surrounding it.


A collection of small statues display the silk colors for some of the major farms.


The main grandstands. This isn’t your county fairgrounds.



Inside the grandstands they had a horse shoe display – Nikes for Thoroughbreds.


A track side view of the main grandstands.


The morning fog gave a surreal feeling to the track.


The finish line – the ‘dirt’ track is in the foreground, the turf track is just behind it.


Attending major sporting events are always a great time, but sometimes the best photography is when nobody is there.