Tigre, Argentina – November 2019 – A Brief Visit to the Delta Town

Bienvenidos to Tigre, Argentina.




Tigre is at the end of one of the lines of the commuter rail from Buenos Aires. They have a very stylish station.




Tigre is known as the gateway to the Parana Delta. This area covers the size of Connecticut, and is made up of hundreds of islands (and no roads). All of the transportation into the delta is via boat.

As a result Tigre is a tourist destination, with many attractions throughout the delta.




We had no particular plans for this day so we wandered around town. There are numerous boat clubs along the Tigre River. In this case, they are across the street, so they have a unique rail system to get their boats to the river.




Many of the clubs have very ornate buildings.




The parilla is on the grill for later!




Where could this guy be going with his load of bamboo boxes?




Why to Puerto De Furtos (the Fruit Port) of course.



The port takes up a number of piers along the river.




Tourist boats are constantly going by.




While across the river are some unique structures.




It is an interesting blend of old and new.




We went looking for fruit, but were disappointed as the entire area has been restored into a tourist market area. Still is was an interesting area, with great photo ops.













On the way back to the rail station we passed by this interestingly decorated building, with American baseball greats of the past.

Tigre is an interesting town, and we look forward to spending more time there and adventure into the delta further.






Marietta, Ohio – September 2019 – Sternwheeler Festival

In the early days of river transportation a common style of boat was the sternwheeler. With it’s distinctive large wooden wheel on the back (stern) to propel it, it was a common sight along the Ohio River.

Today most of the sternwheels are mostly decorative, with a traditional propeller providing most of the propulsion. The boats at the Marietta Sternwheeler Festival were mostly campers on boats.


































New York City – August 2019 – Circling Manhattan

With a trip for work to New York City I had little time for sightseeing, but my wife didn’t! This is her photo blog of a 4 hour New York Architectural Society (almost) circumnavigation of Manhattan. I say almost, since there was a bridge on the Harlem River in a down position so they had to backtrack back around.

They set sail from a pier in Chelsea.



And headed for the harbor…





Passing by Jersey City…



The trip was actually offered for college credit, so there was an instructor on board whom reportedly spoke ‘constantly’. The trip took them past Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty, which I wouldn’t think would need any dialog to explain.





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It was time to head up the East River…



This carousel in a park in Brooklyn came from a defunct amusement park in my hometown of Youngstown, Ohio.



Nearby was a jet ski school!



As you make you way up the East River you go past many areas that are undergoing gentrification.



An interesting view of Roosevelt Island, and the 59th Street (Queensboro) Bridge.



The United Nations Building



Roosevelt Island was once home to a Tuberculosis Hospital, but now is home to thousands in new apartment buildings.



A great view of the bridge and the Roosevelt Island Tram.



A series of bridges on the far end of the East River, where they ended up turning around.



If you have plenty of money ($850 one way for a 30 minute plane ride) you can get from Manhattan to the Hamptons in a hurry on a seaplane.



Or a helicopter…



The cruise continued back down the East River




The late afternoon sun made a interesting view of the Staten Island Ferry with the statue in the background.



The World Trade Center from the Hudson River



One of the many New York Waterway ferries.



Finally some interesting new architecture along the Hudson.

I think you will agree her photos were great – I am so jealous I had to work, it looks like it was a great cruise 🙂





New York City – June 2019 – Different Ways to Get Around Town

On the ground, on the water, or in the air there are many ways to get around the city.

Let’s start with a city bus. Not just any bus, but a collection of historic buses from the MTA Museum:











Via the water…









Always a favorite – the Roosevelt Island Tram.



Or the train…



For now it is time to get out of town – over the swamps of Jersey.






New York City – June 2019 – East River Views

Most of my time in New York City is spent on the Jersey side, therefore most of the photos of the skyline is from across the Hudson. On this trip I had a chance to view Manhattan from the East River.




































Boquillas, Mexico – May 2019 – Crossing the Rio Grande

The small Mexican town of Boquillas was for many years a mining town, until that ended in 1919. Fortunately for Boquillas it lies directly across the Rio Grande from Big Bend National Park.

This worked great for years, with tourists crossing the border to go up into town for lunch, then returning to the park. All that ended with 9-11, and the border closings.

For more than 10 years the small town dwindled down to almost nothing, until finally the US Government built a remote immigration center and the flow started again.



The border crossing is only open on Friday, Saturday, Sunday and Monday, but our good luck had us there on a Sunday so we headed across the river in a rowboat.



The ‘Park and Ride’ lot on the Mexican side was where we picked up our ‘ride’ into town – a burro.



The townsfolk have this worked out – the family own some burros, and they walk along with you as you ride up the 1/2 mile hill into town, where they take you to their family owned restaurant. (there are two restaurants in town).

The food and cold beer were excellent.



After lunch they showed us around town, stopping off at his wife’s souvenir stand where we picked up something.



Their little town is resourceful. With a church and a school, they have everything they need to survive 160 miles from the nearest town in Mexico.




They do make trips across to the Rio Grande Village in the park to pick up needed supplies.

We continued our tour around town. While there are a few abandoned buildings, most are in use.















We stopped at the Park and Ride lot in town for our trip back down the hill.



A quick ride across the Rio Grande, followed by a brief visit to US immigration and we were on our way – full from lunch and with great memories of a cool little Mexican town.