Virtual Travel – Florida

I have had the opportunity to travel many places outside of the United States. When I speak with people in foreign countries and ask if they have ever been in the United States, those that answer yes usually have been to two places – New York City and Florida.

Florida is another state I have been to only a few times, and then mostly for Spring Training baseball. This posting will once again depend on the internet for additional photos.

Since the late 1800s Florida has been the east coast place to go to escape winter. Our virtual tour starts with the 1948 map.

Florida has had population growth that rivals the western states. In 1948 there were about 2.5 million people living in the state; today there are about 22 million, making it the 3rd most populated state.

The cover of the 1948 map is showing the Overseas Highway – U.S. Route 1. This road travels 113 miles from the southern tip of the Florida peninsula to Key West.

Originally a railroad route, it was partially destroyed in a 1935 hurricane. When the Florida East Coast Railway was unable to afford to rebuild, they sold the bridges and roadbed to the state of Florida, where it was eventually rebuilt as a highway.

Government State Florida 1948

 

This photo from the South Florida Sentinel newspaper gives a good aerial view of one section of the road.

The Overseas Highway to Key West was ranked as one of the best scenic drives in the world. (Pisa Photography/Shutterstock)

 

 

The backside of the 1948 map has a cartoon map featuring many of the attractions of the state. While there has been tremendous growth, many of these features are still there.

Government State Florida 1948 4.jpg

 

 

Government State Florida 1948 3.jpg

 

 

 

The 1954 edition shows a beach scene, most likely from the Miami Beach area. By the 1950s the Art Deco area was thought of as old, and new ‘modern’ development was taking over.

Government State Florida 1954

 

This photo shows the main street in Miami Beach, Collins Avenue, in 1954

Post image

 

 

 

1963 – A creative approach, the beach has been formed in the shape of the state.

Government State Florida 1963

 

Our 1963 additional photo is from the Castaways Bar in Miami Beach – corutesy of Pintrest.

Castaways Bar ~ Miami Beach 1963

 

 

 

1965 – More beach scenes.

Government State Florida 1965

 

 

Most of the 1970s were generic, unidentified scenes.

Government State Florida 1970   Government State Florida 1973

 

1971 and 1972 used the same map, just adding 1972 to the later one.

Government State Florida 1971

 

 

For the American Bicentennial in 1976 Florida looks back at the nearly 400 years since the Spanish first landed in what became the state.

The Spanish arrived in 1513 when Ponce de Leon landed near St Augustine. He named the area la Florida in honor of Spain’s Easter time celebration Pascua florida (feast of the flowers).

St Augustine is proud of the fact they are the oldest continuously inhabited (European descent) city in the Western Hemisphere, having been established in 1565.

Government State Florida 1976

 

St Augustine’s most famous historic site is Castillo de San Marcos, a Spanish stone fortress built more than 300 years ago. Photo from Visitstaugustine.com

 

 

The nondescript maps continued through the rest of the 1970s.

Government State Florida 1977.jpg      Government State Florida 1979.jpg

 

 

1983 – Cape Canaveral has always been the home of manned space flight launches, so when the Space Shuttle program started in 1981, it was natural that they launched from here as well.

Government State Florida 1983

 

 

1985 – Cape Florida Lighthouse at Key Biscayne in Miami. This lighthouse was originally built in 1825.

Government State Florida 1985.jpg

 

 

 

1991 – The Sunshine Skyway. This bridge crosses lower Tampa Bay, spanning a distance of over 4 miles. The towers rise over 400 feet above the water level, with the road deck being 180′ high.

The original bridge was built in 1954 as a two lane bridge. In 1969 an additional span was added. In 1980 a freighter hit the bridge, causing a collapse that killed 35 people as their cars and a bus plunged into the bay. Afterward they decided to replace both spans with the new bridge. Note the large barriers in the water to prevent this from happening again.

Government State Florida 1991.jpg

 

 

Once again in 1993 and 1994 Florida used the same cover.

Government State Florida 1993.jpg

 

 

In the early 2000s Florida sold out totally and included advertising on the cover of their maps as each one had a happy family at Universal Studios.

Government State Florida 2001.jpg       Government State Florida 2002.jpg

 

Government State Florida 2004.jpg       Government State Florida 2005.jpg

 

Universal Studios in Florida  was designed from the start to be both a working studio and an amusement park. Today it is the 6th most visited park in the United States (the 5 ahead of it are all Disney parks).

Universal Studios Florida - Harry Potter

 

 

 

2006 – Finally some love for northern Florida. This view of Jacksonville shows the John Alsop Bridge and the Wells Fargo Center.

Government State Florida 2006.jpg

 

 

 

2009 – Sea World is featured. This park opened in 1973, not long after Disneyworld.

Government State Florida 2009.jpg

 

 

Since 2010 all Florida maps have the happy families at the beach. This has been their meal ticket for 150 years, and will continue to be forever.

Government State Florida 2010.jpg       Government State Florida 2011.jpg

 

Government State Florida 2012      Government State Florida 2013.jpg

 

 

Government State Florida 2014.jpg       Government State Florida 2016.jpg

 

Government State Florida 2017.jpg       Government State Florida 2018.jpg

 

All these maps and not one mention of Spring Training baseball. While there are still a number of teams training in Florida, the ones below have been lost to Arizona.

 

Vero Beach – Los Angeles Dodgers

2007 03 10 13 Los Angeles Dodgers Spring Training Vero Beach Florida.jpg

 

 

Sarasota – Cincinnati Reds

2007 03 09 32 Cincinnati Reds Spring Training Sarasota Florida.jpg

 

 

 

Lake Wales – Cleveland Indians

2007 03 09 37 Cleveland Indians Spring Training Winter Haven Florida.jpg

 

 

 

Among those still there

Bradenton – Pittsburgh Pirates

2007 03 09 2 Pittsburgh Pirates Spring Training Bradenton Florida.jpg

 

 

Viero – Washington Nationals

2007 03 08 10 Washington Nationals Spring Training Viero Florida.jpg

 

 

Kissimmee – Houston Astros

2007 03 06 Houston Astros Spring Training Site Kissimmee Florida 10.jpg

 

 

Disneyworld – Atlanta Braves

2007 03 02 Atlanta Braves Spring Training Disney 50.jpg

 

 

And finally – Lakeland – Detroit Tigers

2007 03 04 1 Detroit Tigers Spring Training Lakeland.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

Virtual Travel – Delaware

Our visit to the smallest state in area in the country will also result in the smallest posting, with only 5 maps in the collection, all in the last 20 years. With very few photos of Delaware, this posting will share photos found on the internet.

 

2001 – The Delaware Memorial Bridge. These twin bridges cross the Delaware River, carrying an average of 80,000 cars a day. As the main route from New York, Philadelphia and points north to Baltimore, Washington and points south this route is constantly busy with car and truck traffic.

The bridge was designed by firm HNTB. This same firm designed the Walt Whitman Bridge in Philadelphia, and the Verrazzano Narrows Bridge in New York City. All have a similar look.

The Kalmar Nyckel was a Swedish ship built in 1638 to carry settlers to the New World. A replica of that ship was built in Wilmington in the late 1990s.

Government State Delaware 2001.jpg

 

This photo from the American Bridge website shows a view from high above the bridge deck.

 

 

 

2003 – Smith Bridge, Brandywine Valley. In 1839 Isaac Smith and his son Edward built a mill, and a covered bridge. This bridge, while reinforced in the 1950s, stood until 1961 when an arsonist burnt the bridge.

It was originally replaced with an open deck wooden bridge, but in 2002 this reproduction bridge was built. It uses the same truss design but the road deck is reinforced steel.

Government State Delaware 2003.jpg

 

 

 

 

2006 – Brandywine Park in Wilmington. Located along Brandywine Creek, this park dates from 1886 with assistance from Fredrick Law Olmsted.  The park is listed on the National Historic Registry.

Government State Delaware 2006.jpg

 

 

This photo from the Delaware State Parks website shows the park in spring.

The Van Buren Street bridge, built in 1906

 

 

 

Delaware has a small coastline. This photo show the remains of the Fort Miles Observation Tower. These towers were built during World War I. Later the fort was used as a secret listening post assigned to identify route submarines.

Government State Delaware 2008.jpg

 

 

 

2012 – Delaware is very proud of Caesar Rodney. While Paul Revere gets all the notoriety for his ride in Massachusetts, Rodney made a 70 mile ride through a thunderstorm on the night of July 1, 1776. His goal – to arrive in time for a July 2nd vote to break a deadlock for Delaware’s addition to the Declaration of Independence.

Government State Delaware 2012.jpg

 

This statue is located in downtown Wilmington. Photo credit to a website called ‘Onlyinyourstate.com’.

Delaware – our small visit to this small state is complete.

 

 

 

 

 

Virtual Travel – Colorado

Colorado is another of my favorite states. With it’s towering mountains and sunshine it is a majestic place.

Our visit starts with a 1948 Colorado map. Much like many of the western states Colorado was a very different place 70 + years ago. When this map was published there was less than 1.2 million Coloradans. Today it is nearing 6 million.

Government State Colorado 1948.jpg

 

 

The state is filled with amazing natural wonders. The backside of the 1948 map details many of these.

Government State Colorado 1948 2.jpg

 

 

 

 

Colorado however is not all mountainous. In fact the eastern 1/3, including Denver, is located on the high plains. It is most impressive where the plains reach the mountains, as in this scene where the newly completed Denver to Boulder Turnpike shows.

The turnpike was opened in 1951, just in time to make the cover of this 1953 map.

Government State Colorado 1953.jpg

 

These photos from 2012 show a similar scene.

2012 07 04 8 Boulder CO

 

2012 07 04 14 Boulder CO.jpg

 

2012 07 04 4 Boulder CO.jpg

 

 

 

As we move into the 1960s the cover scene is Maroon Lake, near Aspen.

Government State Colorado 1964.jpg

 

Founded as a mining camp for the Colorado Silver Boom, Aspen later found the real money was in snow – for skiing. Around the time this map came out Aspen was becoming a destination for the rich and famous, resulting in some of the most expensive real estate in the country. The photo below is representative of the wealth in Aspen, with a line of private jets at the airport – in the summer!

2012 07 06 5 Aspen.jpg

 

 

Buttermilk Mountain – where I learned to ski a lifetime ago, as part of a group trip with a bunch of people from Chicago. Nothing like being 22 years old, crashing down a mountain in the day and partying in Aspen at night. There were about 15 people in a house designed for 8, but it worked.

2012 07 06 11 Aspen.jpg

 

As you leave Aspen heading due east you cross Independence Pass. This pass is closed in the winter because of the heavy snow, but is beautiful in the summer.

2012 07 06 19 Independence Pass Colorado.jpg

 

 

Independence Pass – the treeline is very clearly in evidence here as you peak out at 12,095 feet – 3686 meters to my metric friends.

2012 07 06 51 Independence Pass Colorado.jpg

 

 

 

The mountain scenes continue in 1965 with Berthoud Pass. The pass is named for Edward Berthoud, the chief surveyor for the Colorado Central Railroad in the 1870s.

As with most roads through the mountains in Colorado, the routes were originally blazed by the railroads.

Government State Colorado 1965.jpg

 

 

 

 

For 1966 and 1967 unidentified mountain scenes grace the cover.

Government State Colorado 1966.jpg           Government State Colorado 1967.jpg

 

 

It isn’t hard to find great mountain scenes in Colorado – this view is going up Mt Evans.

2012 07 05 51 Mt Evans Colorado.jpg

 

 

 

 

The mountain scenes continues throughout the 1960s and 1970s

Government State Colorado 1968.jpg        Government State Colorado 1969.jpg

 

Government State Colorado 1970.jpg      Government State Colorado 1971

 

Government State Colorado 1972.jpg      Government State Colorado 1973

 

 

All of the maps from this era featured the state symbols on the reverse side.

Government State Colorado 1974.jpg        Government State Colorado 1974 2

 

 

 

Colorado is known as the Centennial State, as it was admitted to the Union in 1876. The country’s bicentennial year in 1976 was more special for Colorado as the state celebrated it’s 100th anniversary.

The cover of this year’s map shows just how tough it was for those early travelers.

Government State Colorado 1976

 

This view of Interstate 70 through Glenwood Canyon shows how much easier travel is today. This section of Interstate is known as an engineering marvel, it’s design took into consideration the flora and fauna, and natural surroundings, while providing a much needed transportation route through the mountains.

2012 07 05 226 Glenwood Canyon.jpg

 

 

 

The late 1970s continued the mountain scenes.

Government State Colorado 1977.jpg    Government State Colorado 1979

 

 

 

Denver is featured in 1978. One of America’s great cities, Denver has a feel like no other – very young and energetic.

Government State Colorado 1978.jpg

 

2012 07 07 12 Colorado Springs to Denver.jpg

 

2010 05 21 Colorado 22 Denver.jpg

 

 

2010 05 21 Colorado 25 Denver.jpg

 

 

Union Station is a classic train station. It has been remodeled since these photos were taken in 2010.

2010 05 21 Colorado 12 Denver.jpg

 

 

2010 05 21 Colorado 15 Denver.jpg

 

 

Denver International Airport – the roof represents the mountains of Colorado.

2010 05 21 Colorado 34 Denver.jpg

 

 

2010 05 21 Colorado 36 Denver.jpg

 

 

 

Aspen is again featured in 1987.

Government State Colorado 1987.jpg

 

 

 

For 1988 Garden of Gods is on the cover, with Pike’s Peak in the distance.

Government State Colorado 1988.jpg

 

 

We made a stop at the Garden of the Gods in 2012…

2012 07 06 263 Garden of the Gods Colorado.jpg

 

 

In 2012 there were a number of very large forest fires impacting Colorado. On the afternoon we visited Garden of the Gods the first rain in weeks had just occurred, a huge thunderstorm that soaked everything. The entire state smelled of a campfire that had just been put out with water. Not only did it greatly aid in the forest fires, but it gave the wildlife a much needed drink.

2012 07 06 295 Garden of the Gods Colorado

 

2012 07 06 266 Garden of the Gods Colorado.jpg

 

 

2012 07 06 271 Garden of the Gods Colorado.jpg

 

2012 07 06 282 Garden of the Gods Colorado.jpg

 

2012 07 06 290 Garden of the Gods Colorado.jpg

 

2012 07 06 299 Garden of the Gods Colorado.jpg

 

2012 07 06 303 Garden of the Gods Colorado.jpg

 

 

 

 

Telluride is another ski town that has a number of tourists in the summer for the ranch life.

Government State Colorado 1990.jpg

 

 

Coincidentally the next Colorado map in my collection is from 1997, and again features the area around Telluride.

Government State Colorado 1997.jpg

 

 

 

Pawnee Buttes is featured in 1999. This geologic feature is not located in the mountains, rather it is located in far northeastern Colorado on the prairies.

Government State Colorado 1999 2.jpg

 

 

The landscape is mostly flat, until you come across this area.

2010 05 23 Colorado 26 Pawnee Bluffs.jpg

 

 

Rising out of the prairies are two 300′ high buttes.

2010 05 23 Colorado 3 Pawnee Bluffs.jpg

 

 

The buttes are a result of erosion of the surrounding high plains.

2010 05 23 Colorado 47 Pawnee Bluffs.jpg

 

 

2010 05 23 Colorado 8 Pawnee Bluffs.jpg

 

 

2010 05 23 Colorado 29 Pawnee Bluffs.jpg

 

 

2010 05 23 Colorado 33 Pawnee Bluffs.jpg

 

 

 

Chautauqua Park in Bolder is on the 2002 cover. The Chautauqua society was an adult education movement from the late 1800s.

Government State Colorado 2002 2.jpg

 

Boulder is home to the University of Colorado. Situated at the base of Boulder Mountain, it is a great little city with some impressive parks.

2012 07 04 35 Boulder CO.jpg

 

2012 07 04 37 Boulder CO.jpg

 

2012 07 04 39 Boulder CO.jpg

 

2012 07 04 40 Boulder CO.jpg

 

 

Interestingly there was a second edition map printed in 2002 featuring Lake Isabelle.

Government State Colorado 2002.jpg

 

 

 

Mesa Verde National Park is the 2003 subject.

Government State Colorado 2003.jpg

 

Mesa Verde is not only a national park, it is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It has some of the best Ancestral Puebloan archaeological dwellings in the United States.

For thousands of years the area was inhabited by Paleo Indians. There are over 600 cliff dwellings in the park, including the one featured here – The Cliff Palace.

A visit in 2015 gave lots of photo ops at this amazing place.

2015 09 19 16 Mesa Verde National Park CO.jpg

 

2015 09 19 21 Mesa Verde National Park CO.jpg

 

 

2015 09 19 50 Mesa Verde National Park CO.jpg

 

 

2015 09 19 51 Mesa Verde National Park CO.jpg

 

 

2015 09 19 66 Mesa Verde National Park CO.jpg

 

 

2015 09 19 97 Mesa Verde National Park CO.jpg

 

 

2015 09 19 112 Mesa Verde National Park CO.jpg

 

 

2015 09 19 113 Mesa Verde National Park CO.jpg

 

 

2015 09 19 122 Mesa Verde National Park CO.jpg

 

 

2015 09 19 139 Mesa Verde National Park CO.jpg

 

 

2015 09 19 152 Mesa Verde National Park CO.jpg

 

 

2015 09 19 182 Mesa Verde National Park CO.jpg

 

 

2015 09 19 189 Mesa Verde National Park CO.jpg

 

 

2015 09 19 211 Mesa Verde National Park CO.jpg

 

 

Some people apparently can’t read….

2015 09 19 171 Mesa Verde National Park CO.jpg

 

 

 

 

In addition to the regular road map Colorado for a few years published an Educational Map, highlighting areas that can be used as a teaching opportunity for young people.

Government State Colorado 2008.jpg

 

We had the opportunity to observe rafters on the Arkansas River during a trip on the Royal Gorge Scenic Railroad…

2012 07 06 179 Royal Gorge Railroad Colorado.jpg

 

 

2012 07 06 187 Royal Gorge Railroad Colorado.jpg

 

 

The Royal Gorge Bridge. Built as a tourist attraction in 1929 as the world’s highest bridge, suspended 955 feet above the river. It held this title until 2001.

It is still the highest bridge in the United States, although it is primarily a pedestrian bridge.

2012 07 06 189 Royal Gorge Railroad Colorado.jpg

 

 

 

For much of the ‘teens’ the return to generic outdoor scenes returned.

Government State Colorado 2010 Educational.jpg      Government State Colorado 2010.jpg

 

Government State Colorado 2012.jpg      Government State Colorado 2014.jpg

 

 

 

Our last stop on this tour is Red Rocks Amphitheater. This natural bowl provides the perfect setting for concerts; numerous artists have recorded live albums here.

We had the opportunity to see the Blues Travelers here for a 4th of July concert.

Colorado – easily one of the 5 best states in the country to live, or visit.

Government State Colorado 2019.jpg

 

 

2010 05 20 Colorado 77 Clear Red Rocks Park.jpg

 

2010 05 20 Colorado 82 Clear Red Rocks Park.jpg

 

2012 07 04 127 Red Rocks.jpg

 

2012 07 04 128 Red Rocks.jpg

 

2012 07 04 140 Red Rocks.jpg

 

 

2010 05 20 Colorado 79 Clear Red Rocks Park.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

Virtual Travel – California

Today we make our way to the Golden State – California. As most people know California is known for, among other things, their car culture. That culture apparently never translated to CalTrans, who never seem to have published maps.

Instead most Californians have relied on the auto club for their travel tools. The state has two major auto clubs – The Auto Club of Southern California and the California State Automobile Association, which covers Northern California.

The auto club maps rarely featured photos, mostly just graphically interesting maps.

For this posting we will mix together vintage Auto Club maps with photos from various years of the highlights of the state.

 

The map below dates from the 1950s and covers the entire state.

Auto Club California State Auto Association California 1940.jpg

 

 

 

A view of the map itself shows the famed freeways of the state still a few years away. This view has the area from the coast around San Francisco to the mountains and Yosemite National Park, going south as far as Santa Barbara.

Auto Club California State Auto Association California 1940 4.jpg

 

 

Our tour will start in San Francisco….

Auto Club SoCal San Francisco 1997

 

 

The view back toward downtown from Twin Peaks on a cloudy day.

2016 05 21 19 San Francisco.jpg

 

 

While most of San Francisco streets are in a grid system, the area directly around Twin Peaks have streets with curves resulting in a haphazard look to the houses.

2016 05 21 20 San Francisco.jpg

 

 

The Golden Gate bridge with the tops of the towers obscured by the low clouds.

2016 05 21 26 San Francisco.jpg

 

 

The cool, weirdness of Haight Asbury.

2016 05 21 58 San Francisco.jpg

 

 

Isotope Comic Book Shop and their artistic toilet lids.

2016 05 21 72 San Francisco.jpg

 

 

San Francisco from Angel Island.

2016 05 21 142 San Francisco.jpg

 

 

 

An evening at the Santa Cruz Beach.

2016 05 21 167 Santa Cruz.jpg

 

 

San Luis Reservoir as we head towards the central valley.

2016 05 22 14 Central California.jpg

 

 

 

Yosemite! One of the best National Parks.

2016 05 22 45 Yosemite.jpg

 

2016 05 22 71 Yosemite.jpg

 

2016 05 23 6 Yosemite.jpg

 

 

 

The Central Valley is the produce capital of the country.

2016 05 23 33 Fresno Area.jpg

 

2016 05 24 5 Tulare County.jpg

 

 

Sequoia National Park.

2016 05 23 41 Sequoia Kings Canyon.jpg

 

 

2016 05 23 122 Sequoia Kings Canyon.jpg

 

 

Kings Canyon National Park.

2016 05 23 105 Sequoia Kings Canyon.jpg

 

2016 05 23 116 Sequoia Kings Canyon.jpg

 

 

 

 

Let’s move on to Northeastern California.

Auto Club California State Auto Association Northeastern California 1991.jpg

 

 

Lassen National Park

2016 05 29 20 Lassen National Park.jpg

 

 

 

Lava Tubes

2016 05 29 41 Lava Beds National Monument.jpg

 

 

2016 05 29 51 Lava Beds National Monument.jpg

 

 

 

Hieroglyphs in far northern California

2016 05 29 88 Lava Beds National Monument.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

Northwestern California is home to some amazing coastlines and forests.

Auto Club California State Auto Association Northwestern California 1987

 

 

Our tour of Northwest California starts out with the Francis Ford Coppola Winery in Geysersville.

2016 05 26 4 Geyserville CA Coppolla Winery.jpg

 

 

Lake Sonoma.

2016 05 26 37 Sonoma County.jpg

 

 

The Mendocino County coast.

2016 05 26 47 Mendocino County.jpg

 

2016 05 26 68 Mendocino County.jpg

 

2016 05 26 84 Mendocino County.jpg

 

 

Fort Bragg, California (not to be confused with the actual U.S. Army Fort Bragg in North Carolina).

2016 05 26 102 Mendocino County.jpg

 

 

2016 05 27 8 Mendocino County.jpg

 

 

 

One of the ultimate tourist traps – the Drive Thru Tree in Leggett, California.

2016 05 27 29 Mendocino County.jpg

 

 

 

Redwood Forest.

2016 05 27 78 Humboldt County.jpg

 

 

 

Eureka, California

2016 05 27 113 Humboldt County.jpg

 

 

We were  lucky enough to be in Arcata, California for one of the coolest festivals we ever saw – the Kinetics Festival.

2016 05 28 169 Arcata CA Kinetics Festival.jpg

 

2016 05 28 173 Arcata CA Kinetics Festival.jpg

 

 

Trinity Lake

2016 05 28 194 Shasta County.jpg

 

 

Shasta Dam and lake with Mount Shasta in the background.

2016 05 28 225 Shasta County.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

This 1927 map  is the Circle Tour of Southern California. Leaving downtown Los Angeles it takes you east past San Bernardino to Palm Springs, before heading south through the desert, finally returning to the coast at San Diego.

Auto Club SoCal Circle Tour 1927.jpg

 

 

 

Auto Club SoCal Circle Tour 1927 2.jpg

 

We will recreate the highlights of this tour 90 years later…

The Bradbury Building in downtown Los Angeles was there when this map was published.

2009 08 22 7 Los Angeles.jpg

 

 

Driving through the desert to Palm Springs.

2009 08 24 44 IAMMMMW Road.jpg

 

Palm Springs from high up on Mount San Jacinto.

2009 08 24 78 Mt San Jacinto and Palm Springs Tram.jpg

 

 

San Diego – This late 1940s map shows a San Diego that was just becoming a major city.

Auto Club SoCal San Diego County 1948

Auto Club SoCal San Diego County 1952 3

 

By 2012 it was a beautiful city by the bay.

2009 08 23 27 San Diego.jpg

 

Petco Park – Home of the San Diego Padres (trivia time – the Padres are the only major league sports team whose name is entirely in non English)

2009 08 23 70 San Diego Petco Field.jpg

 

 

And finally back in Los Angeles – although this 1920s map is missing LAX (among other things).

Auto Club SoCal Los Angeles Central Section 1940 2.jpg

 

 

2012 03 10 153 Los Angeles Scenes.jpg

 

 

2012 03 10 148 Los Angeles Griffith Park.jpg

 

 

2012 03 10 133 Los Angeles Griffith Park.jpg

 

2006 11 07 9 Downtown Los Angeles.jpg

 

 

 

2012 03 10 144 Los Angeles Griffith Park.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Virtual Travel – Arkansas

Today’s stop on the virtual tour of the United States is Arkansas. Located in the south central part of the country it is a state I have only visited a couple of times, and then very briefly. I have however managed to collect 34 different years of state highway maps.

The only photo I have taken with Arkansas actually is 1/2 Texas – Texarkana Post Office and Courthouse – literally split down the middle by the two states.

2015 09 24 5 Texarkana AR TX.jpg

 

 

We start today’s tour with a 1958 map highlighting a freeway interchange in Little Rock. While there have been limited access highways in the United States since the 1930s, the U.S. President in the 1950s, Dwight Eisenhower, was a strong proponent on the improvement of the road system in the country. As a result the Federal Aid Highway Act of 1956 was passed.

This act authorized the construction of 41,000 miles of limited access (no crossroads, etc) freeways. While some states had made some significant progress by 1958, in Arkansas it was limited – the exit shown was one of just a handful in the state.

Government State Arkansas 1958.jpg

 

 

 

We move ahead 10 years to 1968 and find the cover with a nice view of the Ozark Mountains. The Ozarks aren’t particularly high, reaching a maximum elevation of 2,560.

While the Ozarks reach into Missouri, they are best known as part of Arkansas. As this photo shows the terrain is tree covered with numerous rock outcroppings. In addition there are a number of scenic rivers and lakes.

Government State Arkansas 1968.jpg

 

 

 

The 1970 map starts an amazingly long period where the look of the maps do not change. The maps are consistently basic, with the inside being the statewide map, and the backside having a few city maps. Unlike most states there is little in the way of tourist information like guides to parks.

The covers continue to highlight the natural scenery with this view of the Ouachita Mountains. Much like the Ozarks they are relatively small, tree covered mountains. As the map notes this view is overlooking the Hot Springs National Park. Situated next to the city of the same name Hot Springs has long been an attraction.

The town has famous and infamous periods, including being an attractive location during prohibition for people like Al Capone to come hang out. The town has a collection of historic bathhouses and many other architectural significant buildings.

Government State Arkansas 1970.jpg

 

This checkered history is celebrated with a statue of Al outside the Ohio Club in Hot Springs. (photo from Dayton Daily news website).

Statue of Al Capone outside the Ohio Club in Hot Springs, Arkansas.

 

 

 

By 1972 the Interstate System was nearing initial completion. This view features Crimson Clover for ground cover.

More than just a 1960s pop song, Crimson clover is a winter annual and herbaceous legume. The leaves and stems of crimson clover resemble those of red clover, but the leaves are round-tipped with more hair on the stems and leaves. Seedlings grow rapidly from the crown forming a rosette. This rosette enlarges as weather becomes favorable. In the spring, the flower stems develop rapidly and end their growth with long, pointed conical flower heads comprised of 75 to 125 florets. Florets are a bright crimson color and open in succession from the bottom to the top

Government State Arkansas 1972.jpg

 

This image (from the internet) gives a nice closeup of Crimson Clover.

Crimson Clover | Best Forage

 

 

 

The 1973 map has a view of Little Rock, the largest city and capital. With about 700,000 people in the area it makes up about 20% of the states population.

With it’s location near the Ouachita Mountains, the city is made up of some rolling hills, along the Arkansas River.

Government State Arkansas 1973.jpg

This photo from the internet shows that the skyline has changed little in the 40 + years since this map was published.

 

 

 

For the American bicentennial the cover is a tribute to the early pioneers.

Government State Arkansas 1976.jpg

 

 

 

The eastern border of Arkansas is the lower Mississippi River. This area is known as the Arkansas Delta, which has geographic similarities to their neighbors in Mississippi. It is the region where cotton is grown.

The area is dotted with lakes, many of them as a result of the river changing course over time. The bald cypress tress shown here are typical of the area.

The area is also known for their music, including blues and country. The most famous person from this area is Johnny Cash.

Government State Arkansas 1977.jpg

 

 

 

The Arkansas State Capitol is featured on the 1979 map. As with the vast majority of state capitol buildings in the country it is built in the Neoclassical style. This building is much newer than many other state capitols, having been completed in 1915.

Government State Arkansas 1979.jpg

 

 

 

For 1981 the photographer chose a view of a small river (the Spring River), a two lane road and a train.

Government State Arkansas 1981.jpg

 

 

 

The Interstate 40 bridge linking West Memphis, Arkansas and Memphis, Tennessee is featured on the 1982 cover. Covering a distance of 9400 feet, and rising over 100 feet above the river, the official name for this bridge is Hernando de Soto Bridge. The two arches of the bridge are to represent the letter ‘M’ (for Memphis), hence the nickname of the structure is the M bridge.

Government State Arkansas 1982.jpg

 

This photo from the internet shows the bridge at night with the ‘M’ lit up. Photo by Trevor Birchett.

 

 

 

The photo for the 1984 edition shows the early fall scene in Garland County. With Arkansas being located in the south this scene likely dates from late October or early November.

Garland County is the home of Hot Springs.

Government State Arkansas 1984.jpg

 

 

 

Another year (1985) another two lane road in the woods. This time we are in Yell County. Strangely this relatively small county, in both population and square miles, has two county seats. In addition it is a ‘dry’ county, with no alcohol sales. Perhaps that is why they Yell.

Government State Arkansas 1985.jpg

 

 

 

The Interstate 430 bridge over the Arkansas River at Little Rock is shown on the 1986 map. This freeway bypasses the city to the west.

Government State Arkansas 1986.jpg

 

 

 

The 1987 map has a radical departure on the look of the title on the cover, but not much else. More bridges and roads through the countryside.

Government State Arkansas 1987.jpg

 

 

 

Once again in 1989 the scene goes unidentified. But good news – there is a bridge involved.

Government State Arkansas 1989.jpg

 

 

 

For 1990 we get a return of the red backgrounds for the titles, along with descriptions of the scene. This view is from Highway 7 in Perry County, with a dogwood tree in full bloom in the foreground.

Government State Arkansas 1990.jpg

 

 

Perry County is home to a huge Goat Festival (photo from KARK TV station). The festival attracts 4000 people to the small town of Perrysville.

Goat Festival Perryville AR 201710 KSJ_5638ps_1538704669851.jpg.jpg

 

 

 

Big changes for the Arkansas map in 1993 – Bill Clinton, a native son was elected president. Unfortunately they have returned to photos of generic scenes without descriptions. This pattern continued for the next few years.

Government State Arkansas 1993.jpg

 

1994

Government State Arkansas 1994.jpg

 

 

1995

Government State Arkansas 1995.jpg

 

1996

Government State Arkansas 1997.jpg

 

 

For 1998 the descriptions have returned. This mountain scene is U.S. Highway 65 near the Buffalo National River in Searcy County.

Government State Arkansas 1998.jpg

 

 

Searcy County is known as the Chocolate Roll Capital of the World. A chocolate roll is a crust filled with chocolate. A recipe found on the internet could be a good thing to fill some time today….

Searcy County Chocolate Roll

Pastry:
1 c. flour
1/2 c. vegetable shortening
1/4 c. cold water
dash of salt

Filling:
3 Tbsp. cocoa powder
1/3 c. butter or margarine
1/3 c. sugar

Incorporate all pastry ingredients into a pie crust-like dough. Roll out. Cream together cocoa powder, sugar and butter and spread on surface of pie crust. Roll from one end, tucking in sides like you would a burrito. Bake at 350 degrees for 10 to 15 minutes or until golden and molten. Let cool 10 minutes before serving.

 

 

 

In 2001 we visit Beaver Lake Dam in Carroll County. The dam has created a large lake that provides recreation as well as drinking water for much of Northwest Arkansas.

Government State Arkansas 2001.jpg

 

 

 

A Corvette and a country road back in Perry County. Since this county is dry too, they are likely headed to the next county to buy a bottle of wine for dinner.

Government State Arkansas 2002.jpg

 

 

 

In 1803 the United States purchased a massive area (828,000 square miles) of land from France for only $15 million dollars. What seems like a good deal was likely a better deal for France as they really didn’t control most of the land – it was still inhabited by Native Americans. The U.S. was buying ‘preemptive’ rights to obtain the Native lands by treaty or conquest (steal).

The entire state of Arkansas was included in this deal.

Government State Arkansas 2003.jpg

 

 

 

To get your Kicks on Route 66 in Arkansas you have to go to Stone County and take the state highway with that number, since the famed U.S. highway of the same number did not go through the state, although it went nearby in southwest Missouri.

Government State Arkansas 2004.jpg

 

 

 

The 2005 map shows the field of daisies at an Interstate interchange. Given the view you would think that the daisy would be the state flower but it is not. The state flower is the apple blossom, a tribute to the time when Arkansas was a large apple producing state, which it no longer is.

Government State Arkansas 2005.jpg

 

 

 

The 1956 Interstate Act 50th anniversary is celebrated on the 2006 map. Ironically neither of the two freeways shown here are interstates, they are both state routes.

Government State Arkansas 2006.jpg

 

 

 

The tunnel shown here is the Bobby Hopper Tunnel. It is the only vehicular tunnel in Arkansas.

Government State Arkansas 2008.jpg

 

 

 

For 2009 the cover shows the recently completed Greenville Bridge, a cable stayed design over the Mississippi River. Construction of this bridge took 16 years.

The new bridge replaced one built in 1940.

Government State Arkansas 2009.jpg

 

 

 

Hot Springs National Park is the scene again for the 2010 map.

Government State Arkansas 2010.jpg

 

As noted previously there are numerous bathhouses in Hot Springs, including one that was in the park itself. The Ozark Bathhouse was closed in 1977 and restored as the National Park Visitor Center. (photo from NPS site)

Ozark Bathhouse viewed from Central Avenue, looking up the front steps.

 

 

 

Another two lane road in 2011 – this time in Pope County. Located in the north central part of the state it is home to the town of Russellville. It is yet again another dry county.

Government State Arkansas 2011.jpg

 

 

 

Logan County is featured on the cover of the 2013 map. This county was originally called Sarber County, after John Sarber, when it was formed in 1871, but the locals felt Mr Sarber was a carpetbagger, so they renamed the county for an early settler James Logan.

Like most of the scenes in the series of Arkansas maps, it is located in the Ozark Mountains.

Government State Arkansas 2013.jpg

 

 

The theme continues in 2015 with this scene from Stone County.

Government State Arkansas 2015.jpg

 

 

 

 

The historic Lawrence County Courthouse is featured on the 2016 map. The courthouse is part of the Powhatan Historic State Park. And yes Lawrence County is like most of north and west Arkansas in that the county is dry. Lets move on to California so we can have a beer!

Government State Arkansas 2016.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New York City – August 2019 – Circling Manhattan

With a trip for work to New York City I had little time for sightseeing, but my wife didn’t! This is her photo blog of a 4 hour New York Architectural Society (almost) circumnavigation of Manhattan. I say almost, since there was a bridge on the Harlem River in a down position so they had to backtrack back around.

They set sail from a pier in Chelsea.



And headed for the harbor…





Passing by Jersey City…



The trip was actually offered for college credit, so there was an instructor on board whom reportedly spoke ‘constantly’. The trip took them past Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty, which I wouldn’t think would need any dialog to explain.





I

It was time to head up the East River…



This carousel in a park in Brooklyn came from a defunct amusement park in my hometown of Youngstown, Ohio.



Nearby was a jet ski school!



As you make you way up the East River you go past many areas that are undergoing gentrification.



An interesting view of Roosevelt Island, and the 59th Street (Queensboro) Bridge.



The United Nations Building



Roosevelt Island was once home to a Tuberculosis Hospital, but now is home to thousands in new apartment buildings.



A great view of the bridge and the Roosevelt Island Tram.



A series of bridges on the far end of the East River, where they ended up turning around.



If you have plenty of money ($850 one way for a 30 minute plane ride) you can get from Manhattan to the Hamptons in a hurry on a seaplane.



Or a helicopter…



The cruise continued back down the East River




The late afternoon sun made a interesting view of the Staten Island Ferry with the statue in the background.



The World Trade Center from the Hudson River



One of the many New York Waterway ferries.



Finally some interesting new architecture along the Hudson.

I think you will agree her photos were great – I am so jealous I had to work, it looks like it was a great cruise 🙂