Columbus – January 2019 – Time Travelling Up High Street

When we lived close to Pittsburgh I would sometimes take old photos and recreate them with the current view. Being a city that has developed significantly since the 1950s, Columbus doesn’t have the quantity of old buildings to match up with current photos, it still offers enough to make for an interesting Sunday afternoon.

Most of the old photographs are from the Library of Congress website, and are in the Detroit Photographic Company section of the online photos (easily the best collection of vintage photos anywhere).

For this effort we made our way up High Street from the south end of downtown to the north end, where the former railroad station was once located.

We start with the grand old Southern Hotel. Still there, and still in the hotel business, it hasn’t changed much from the street view since 1910. A few horse and wagons parked instead of cars, and obviously no traffic lights!





We continued north on High Street, stopping at State Street to take a view back south towards where we just came.

Interestingly none of the 1910 buildings seem to still exist, and those that replaced them have also aged long enough to be re purposed into other functions. Most noteworthy is the large building on the far right on the new photo – it was for many years the downtown flagship Lazarus Department Store, which closed in 2003.







Turning around and looking north on High Street – the State Capitol Building on the right (just out of view). I would estimate this photo to be from between 1910-1915, with the presence of a few automobiles.

Note the two 12-15 floor high buildings on the right. The shorter one was the tallest in the city when completed in 1901, with the slightly taller one surpassing it in 1906. One interesting bit of trivia, one of the original leaders of the NFL was a Columbus native, and as the president of the league their headquarters was in the building on the right from 1927 until 1939.

Along the street in the distance you see mass transit – a street car in the 1910 photo, and a bus in the new one.







A second view of Broad and High Street. The older photo was obviously taken from the 2nd or 3rd floor, which I can’t recreate exactly since the buildings are all closed to the public.

It is amazing that since Broad & High is often considered the center of Ohio, being the two main streets in the city directly across from the Capitol that the small buildings on the northeast corner survive to this day, albeit with significant remodeling.

This view also gives a closer view of the transportation choices of the times.








One last view of Broad & High. The line of streetcars in 1910 and buses now.







Another block north brings us to Gay Street. Note the buildings on the northeast corner are all still in existence – although the concept of a Target store was still 50 years away.








Long Street – The Atlas Building has always been a presence at this corner. Not much about the exterior has changed, a couple of neighbors are missing though. Note that Long Street was a two way street in 1910, with the streetcar tracks down the middle.








High Street at Spring Street – Absolutely nothing remains, most has been replaced in the last 40 years.

Even on a Sunday it was easy to get a bus in every photo, as they seemed to pass by about every 5 minutes. The old photos also had a streetcar in nearly every one.








Our final stop on High Street – Union Station. This location on High Street was the location of the main railway station for Columbus from 1851 until the last train left in 1977. The wonderful building was demolished by 1979.

The station was replaced with a convention center, and later the arcade (shopping mall – not video games) was replaced with shops and restaurants built over the freeway in a style that recalls the architecture of the original.




The convention center and hotel sits exactly where the main concourse was located.




It still remains a public gathering space, only for a different purpose.

With that our time travelling up High Street came to an end. Look for more in future visits to other cities (Chicago, Cleveland) or even more in Columbus.








Hickory Corners, Michigan – September 2018 – Gilmore Car Museum

I have had the opportunity to visit most of America’s great transportation museums. Having that background I can state that in my opinion the Gilmore Car Museum is the best in the country.

2018 09 03 7 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

I had read about the Gilmore for some time now, and had always looked forward to going. With the long Labor Day weekend and the emphasis on cars, now was the time.

When we arrived one of the staff said ‘see you in 4 hours’. He was wrong, we spent 4 1/2 hours 🙂

2018 09 03 30 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

Gilmore is more than just a single building with some cars. It is a campus of buildings and barns, each featuring a genre of cars or car companies.

Each building is immaculate, clean and well light with great presentations. They also take pride in that there aren’t barriers for most cars, just notes to remind you not to touch. This makes photography much easier.

2018 09 03 37 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

Among the buildings is a 1940s diner that was moved from Connecticut. It serves as the restaurant for the museum. We had a basic lunch there, with great milkshakes and friendly staff.

2018 09 03 52 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

An example of one of the barns. This one was moved from a nearby farm, with 2 levels for cars.

2018 09 03 56 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

A complete 1930s Shell Station.

2018 09 03 58 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

The pumps represent different eras.

2018 09 03 70 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

The motorcycle building.

2018 09 03 79 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

Inside are a number of bikes from the early 1900s to current day.

2018 09 03 87 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

 

A vintage Cleveland and 1919 Johnson.

2018 09 03 88 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

As the sign notes – a 1928 Indian. Check out that rear seat.

2018 09 03 106 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

Outside near one of the storage barns is an un-restored London double decker bus.

2018 09 03 114 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

Another building – another collection. This one has a peddle car collection.

2018 09 03 124 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

As with the motorcycles, the collection was vast and pristine.

2018 09 03 129 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

Even some peddle airplanes – how cool.

2018 09 03 138 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

In the 1960s Mr Gilmore built a replica of the train depot for the little town of Hickory Corners. Inside is a hood ornament display.

2018 09 03 158 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

I am always enthralled by the old hood ornaments.

2018 09 03 171 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

Almost too nice for the hood of a car.

2018 09 03 173 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

At the Gilmore they have over 1300 of them.

2018 09 03 175 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

While the photography was tricky with the display cases and the light and shadows, many came out very nice.

2018 09 03 180 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

Also called mascots, it was a common occurrence in the 1930s to personalize your car with a different ornament.

2018 09 03 187 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

Our next building was called ‘The Classics’. Higher end cars from the 1930s.

2018 09 03 205 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

A Cadillac for a movie star.

2018 09 03 230 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

The large two level barn shown earlier from the outside had 1950s cars on the lower level.

2018 09 03 275 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

And the impressive upper level had earlier models.

2018 09 03 284 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

Hudson Motor Car Company made automobiles from 1909 through 1954. This one is from the 1940s.

2018 09 03 295 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

So many great cars.

2018 09 03 298 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

 

In the same barn is a Ford display.

2018 09 03 302 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

 

One interesting feature of the the Gilmore campus is that car clubs build their museums there. In this example the Cadillac club built essentially a Cadillac dealership on the outside.

2018 09 03 307 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

Inside are Cadillacs over the years.

2018 09 03 316 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

Without a doubt the older Cadillacs are much nicer looking than the 1970s and 1980s.

2018 09 03 326 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

The Ford Museum has a complete, authentic 1930s parts counter.

2018 09 03 361 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

The Ford museum is dedicated to Model A’s.

2018 09 03 373 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

A 1930s school bus.

2018 09 03 375 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

As with Cadillac, from the outside it appears to be a vintage Ford dealership.

2018 09 03 383 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

Across the driveway in the main building is the Lincoln building, whom have some of the nicest cars of all.

2018 09 03 398 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

Another earlier Lincoln model.

2018 09 03 411 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

A collection of 1950s and 1960s sports cars.

2018 09 03 414 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

As with Cadillac, Lincoln and Ford, there is a Franklin dealership.

2018 09 03 417 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

 

But back to the Lincolns.

2018 09 03 426 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

Also in the main building is an exhibit for A J Foyt.

2018 09 03 454 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

The main building seemed to have more of a mix of cars.

2018 09 03 499 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

One of the last of the Packards.

2018 09 03 500 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

A stylish 1934 DeSoto Airflow

2018 09 03 506 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

If you are into cars the Gilmore Car Museum is a must to visit.

2018 09 03 510 Hickory Corners MI Gilmore Car Museum.jpg

 

 

 

Washington DC – June 2018 – Museum of American History

Our final stop was the Museum of American History, also known as America’s attic. There is so much to see starting with – Children’s TV icons…

2018 06 03 231 Washington DC Smithsonian National Museum of American History.jpg

 

 

 

A shirtless George Washington?

2018 06 03 242 Washington DC Smithsonian National Museum of American History.jpg

 

 

 

A tribute to Ella Fitzgerald.

2018 06 03 266 Washington DC Smithsonian National Museum of American History.jpg

 

 

 

Early computers.

2018 06 03 253 Washington DC Smithsonian National Museum of American History.jpg

 

 

 

Early money.

2018 06 03 247 Washington DC Smithsonian National Museum of American History.jpg

 

 

 

Commercial advertising standards.

2018 06 03 273 Washington DC Smithsonian National Museum of American History.jpg

 

 

 

Batman’s ride.

2018 06 03 284 Washington DC Smithsonian National Museum of American History.jpg

 

 

 

 

A collection of model ships.

2018 06 03 289 Washington DC Smithsonian National Museum of American History.jpg

 

 

 

Washington DC streetcar.

2018 06 03 294 Washington DC Smithsonian National Museum of American History.jpg

 

 

 

In the transportation hall they had a couple of displays of life in the 1950s.

2018 06 03 302 Washington DC Smithsonian National Museum of American History.jpg

 

 

 

And a feature of the growth of the suburbs.

2018 06 03 303 Washington DC Smithsonian National Museum of American History.jpg

 

 

 

Julia Child’s kitchen.

2018 06 03 308 Washington DC Smithsonian National Museum of American History.jpg

 

 

 

 

2018 06 03 309 Washington DC Smithsonian National Museum of American History.jpg

 

 

 

And her awards.

2018 06 03 310 Washington DC Smithsonian National Museum of American History.jpg

 

 

 

 

Early telegraph.

2018 06 03 314 Washington DC Smithsonian National Museum of American History.jpg

 

 

 

The random eagle.

2018 06 03 328 Washington DC Smithsonian National Museum of American History.jpg

 

 

 

A section about Latino’s in America included this cool Statue of Liberty only featuring a Latino woman holding tomatoes.

2018 06 03 330 Washington DC Smithsonian National Museum of American History.jpg

 

 

There was a section about democracy in America, including a stunning presentation on voting in America, and how often people have tried to control who can vote so they can stay in power – it sadly continues to this day.

2018 06 03 332 Washington DC Smithsonian National Museum of American History.jpg

 

 

 

Presidential election tchotchkes.

2018 06 03 335 Washington DC Smithsonian National Museum of American History.jpg

 

 

 

A 1940s voting machine.

2018 06 03 341 Washington DC Smithsonian National Museum of American History.jpg

 

 

 

A collection of protest signs.

2018 06 03 345 Washington DC Smithsonian National Museum of American History.jpg

 

 

 

Another room housed mechanical items – an early sweeper.

2018 06 03 372 Washington DC Smithsonian National Museum of American History.jpg

 

 

 

Finally in the presidential section was a collection of street signs named after presidents. The Museum of American History is a sensory overload – in my opinion it is second to Air & Space for museums in DC.

2018 06 03 351 Washington DC Smithsonian National Museum of American History.jpg

 

 

Hershey, PA – May 2018 – Antique Automobile Club of America

The Antique Automobile Club of America built a nice transportation museum near Hershey, Pennsylvania. More commonly known as the ACCA Museum, it houses a number of automobiles, trucks, buses and motorcycles.

Currently the very cool Hershey Kissmobile is displayed at the front entrance.

 

2018 05 07 166 Hershey PA AACA Museum.jpg

 

 

 

The building has 3 levels, with a nice lobby featuring a beautiful ragtop.

2018 05 07 172 Hershey PA AACA Museum.jpg

 

 

 

Many of the cars are located within themes.

2018 05 07 188 Hershey PA AACA Museum.jpg

 

 

 

The museum has a nice mix of automobiles and trucks – all restored to original condition.

2018 05 07 193 Hershey PA AACA Museum.jpg

 

 

 

A full Atlantic Gas Station is displayed, complete with the Service Truck.

2018 05 07 197 Hershey PA AACA Museum.jpg

 

 

 

The lower level features the Bus Museum.

2018 05 07 221 Hershey PA AACA Museum.jpg

 

 

 

2018 05 07 223 Hershey PA AACA Museum.jpg

 

 

 

Their current primary exhibit is on Tuckers.

2018 05 07 252 Hershey PA AACA Museum.jpg

 

 

 

Three fully restored Tucker’s are shown.

2018 05 07 255 Hershey PA AACA Museum.jpg

 

 

 

 

Loudenville, OH – July 2016 – Flxible Bus Gathering

As mentioned in a previous posting when we went to Loudenville for the melting ice sculpture festival, Flxible buses had been built there for a number of years. Many people have bought old buses and transformed them into RVs, the most famous being used in the Robin William movie RV. Once every two years a large group of them gather in Loudenville for a reunion.

2016 07 16 Loudenville OH Flxible Bus Roundup 10.jpg

After a brief stop at Mohican State Park, we arrived in ‘downtown’ Loudenville, where we found a nice spot in the shade and waited the 30 minutes or so for the parade to start. The parade was lead off with a local police car, followed by a 1960s Hearse – then you saw them – 15 somewhat smelly, somewhat noisy, but beautiful, lumbering giants coming down the hill.

2016 07 16 Loudenville OH Flxible Bus Roundup 37.jpg

Some of the exteriors were restored to look original to the 1950s or 1960s, but most had very decorative paint jobs. One, clearly a Texan, had an outline of the state painted like the flag with a comet sailing down the side to a porthole for the bathroom outlined with another large star. A field of stars adorned the bottom half of the bus. Most had unique named, like a purple bus called Plum Crazy, another was Ruthie.

2016 07 16 Loudenville OH Flxible Bus Roundup 93.jpg

We sat next to some of the family members who had come in from all over the United States. They told us there was an open house immediately following the parade at the campgrounds just south of town where everyone was staying. So after the 15 minute parade we moved to the campgrounds where we enjoyed an hour of checking out the variety of interior finishes, as well as the very proud owners talking about their effort in their restorations. Most of the interiors appears to have been restored in the 1980s.

2016 07 16 Loudenville OH Flxible Bus Roundup 80.jpg

Our return trip focused on staying on small township or state highways, resulting in a pleasing hour drive back to town. If you find yourself in Loudenville, Ohio in July of even numbered years, a visit to the Flxible Bus Gathering is recommended.

2016 07 16 Loudenville OH Flxible Bus Roundup 126.jpg