Cleveland – February 2019 – Frozen, but Thawing

As usual in winter in the midwest the weather is all over the place. Last week was sub zero Fahrenheit, and by Sunday it was nearly 60 degrees.

Lake Erie tends to ice over quite a bit in the winter, and this year has been no different. Followers of this blog will note the main photo is the iced over Cleveland Harbor lighthouse after a particularly hard winter.

For this day the ice was melting somewhat, but still providing some interesting sights. The photo below is a security fence that was iced completely over, but has melted enough to be translucent.





There was some ice cover near the shore, but with large wet spots that seemed to attract the seagulls. The water provided a nice reflection.





While taking photos of the ice and water, I noticed that this shot got a perfect ‘T’ of airplane contrails in the sky. My assumption is an east-west flight had recently passed at altitude, and the northbound flight had just reached where the east-west contrail was present.





A close up of the birds on the ice.





Despite the look the water inside the breakwater wall is frozen and beyond it is open water.





The wall at Voinovich Park had some ice on it, but with perfect symmetry with the concrete.





The lighthouse has a bit of ice on it, but nothing like the main blog site photo.





The harbor in front of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame still had some light icing on it.





The life preserver is ready if needed.





Meanwhile over at Edgewater Park, the beach had a lot of ice on it.





The ice was very chunky.





The birds clearly congregated near the water, even if it was just pooled on the remaining ice.





The amount of seagulls all along the lake shore was staggering.





Our last stop was along Rocky River. Each spring (or thawing in winter) results in significant flooding in the valleys with the ice jams.





The ravine walls provided a small waterfall. It was a nice day for checking out the melting ice with a different look that the stark white normally associated with the winter ice on the lake (and river)







Cleveland – February 2019 – Radwood

There is a group of auto enthusiasts who celebrate the 1980s and 90s automotive style couple with the overall feel of the time. They encourage period correct dress to go along with the cars.

Normally held outdoors with large audience participation I read online that the Crawford Auto Aviation Museum was holding an exhibit.





The small display of about a dozen cars did feature some fashion.





Some of it the classic (some would say tacky) look straight from Miami Vice.





It is not their goal to have the best, or most expensive cars presented, just ones that are representative of the era.

Overall the exhibit was disappointing because it lacked that audience participation. Fortunately there is more to see at the Crawford.





Most of the museum celebrates the long history of auto making in Cleveland and northern Ohio. One of the longest in business was White Motors who started building cars and trucks in 1900.





In addition to the cars and planes there are numerous large banners celebrating historic Cleveland events including the 1936 Great Lakes Exposition.








For many years Cleveland held the national air races. The exhibit includes a couple of the planes.





The lower level featured more automobiles with historic significance..













We finished by checking out this sweet Cleveland motorcycle







Cleveland – February 2019 – Time Travelling again

As noted on a previous posting I took the opportunity to get some current photos of Cleveland for the second in the ‘Time Travel’ series.

The corner of Euclid Avenue and East 9th Street has always been the financial center of Cleveland. The view below is looking west on Euclid Avenue in 1905.

Note the red building on the left remains from the 1905 photo, while most of the closer buildings have been replaced over the years.

While streetcars no long run down the streets, there are dedicated bus stops in the middle, which is where the new photo was taken from.






Just up the block is the Arcade – which was featured in the earlier posting. This photo is also from around 1905.

And as you can see it hasn’t changed much at all! It is amazing to think of all of the people who have walked these corridors in 130 years.





The Colonial Arcade is just across Euclid Avenue. It too is nearly identical except for the fashion.






Meanwhile just outside of the Colonial Arcade on Prospect Avenue is an exterior view of the hotel.

If you look closely at the top of the new photo you will see a portion of the original sign painted on the outside wall.

Also of note a Kia is now parked where the horse and buggy was in 1900.






Meanwhile back on Euclid Avenue we see the Arcade from the outside, with a view in the distance of the Soldiers and Sailors Monument on Public Square.

As with the early 1900s one – traffic was light on our visit too.






This view is at the monument looking back down Euclid to where we just came from.

Notice the lamp post is still in the same spot in the foreground, just a different lamp.






The Williamson Building below was completed in 1899, and stood until the early 1980s.

In a brief departure from the normal ‘before and after’ photos, the photo below shows the implosion of the Williamson Building in the early 1980s. Of note I am in the crowd somewhere, and was covered from head to toe with the (most likely hazardous) dust.

The result is the aforementioned 200 Public Square Tower. Since the 1930s the iconic Terminal Tower dominated the Cleveland skyline, and Public Square.

When the long time Cleveland industrial giant Standard Oil of Ohio wanted to build their corporate headquarters, the city finally relented and gave permission to have this dominating building. Of course before it was even completed British Petroleum (BP) bought Sohio, so it opened as the BP Building! It has since then changed names a couple of times.

Again as with the earlier photo the wagon with horse has been replaced with the wagon from Honda.








The Northwest Quadrant of Public Square features the Old Stone Church, one of the oldest buildings in Cleveland – built in 1855. The right side has had an additional steeple added, but other than that it is the same.

The church is still there, but all of the other buildings have long since been replaced – so long ago that the replacements are now considered historic.









Finally a look east on Superior Avenue. The Arcade’s northern entrance is visible on the right (just behind the first streetcar in the old photo and with the canopy in the new photo).









Cleveland – February 2019 – Architectural Masterpieces

We spent some time in Cleveland recently and was taking some photos for another ‘Time Travel’ posting (which will be posted later this week), and was able to get some details of a few of the true masterpieces of architecture, not only for Cleveland, but the country.

At the corner of Euclid Avenue and East 9th Street is the former Cleveland Trust Building. Completed in 1907 it features a variety of architectural styles including beaux arts and neoclassical.





After serving downtown Cleveland for nearly 90 year, the building closed in 1996. For the next 20 years there was much discussion about what to do with the building.

In 2015 an upscale grocery store was opened in the impressive rotunda, as well as an adjacent building.





It’s not every day you see a ceiling like this in a grocery store.





Just down the street is the Colonial Arcade. Completed in 1898, the Colonial Arcade spans the entire block between Euclid Avenue and Prospect Avenue.





Today the first floor still has numerous small shops, just as it did 120 years ago when it opened. The upper level are hotel rooms for a Residence Inn.





There are numerous architectural details throughout.





Including the lighting,








Parallel to the Colonial Arcade, and connected via a small interior walkway is the Euclid Arcade.

While it is slightly newer, it is still almost 110 years old.





In most states these buildings would likely be considered some of the best around, but in downtown Cleveland they aren’t even the best ones on the block as just across the street is The Arcade! (so special it has no specific name)





It was completed in 1890, and is considered by many as the first indoor shopping center in America. In my opinion it is second to none in terms of opulence and style of any building around.





For nearly 130 years people have been shopping in this magnificent building, and they continue to do so today.

There are numerous things to see and do in Cleveland but a visit to the Arcade is tops among them.







Cleveland – November 2018 – Dia de Muertos (Day of the Dead)

In Mexican culture the Day of the Dead is celebrated the first two days of November. This celebration honors the memory of those who have passed on.

Presented by the Cleveland Public Theater and Artistas Latinos Unios, Cleveland has had a Dia de Muertos for 14 years.

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Most participants paint their faces.

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While it might seem morbid, it is in fact a joyous occasion that is intended to dispel fear of death and embracing the cycle of life.

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In Cleveland many non Latino people participated.

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While most had face paintings, traditionally hand made clay skulls are also used.

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The Cleveland Public Theater is housed in a former church. Inside they had a number of exhibits set up.

This young lady had one honoring her family.

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As did this young lady. Note in the back numerous photos and offerings to her deceased family members. Throughout the church/theater and outside in the ‘pop up’ cemetery were a number of such altars (known in Spanish as ofrendas)

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One of the event coordinators was ready.

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It was a really cool event, with lots of great looks.

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Stylish and macabre at the same time.

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Finally it was time for the procession to begin…..

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One of the bands lead the march.

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Anyone who had signed up and was in ‘costume’ could participate.

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Some clearly had spent more time putting together their look.

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One of my favorites.

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Many entire families participated.

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This young lady had the face painting but the rest of her family wore the masks.

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Happy skeletons!

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The origins date back thousands of years and coincide with the annual harvest. It combined Aztec and Christian practices.

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Today is has become so popular in the United States even places like Party City sell merchandise for the celebration, although these ladies clearly did better than going down the local Party City.

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Not sure why, but it seems every Cleveland parade has a number of people on stilts. But what’s not to like in a 10′ skeleton lady coming down Detroit Avenue!

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More stilted skeletons.

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A few had more simple masks, which this guy used to accent his great suit.

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Historically in Cleveland most of the Latinos were Puerto Rican, but they too have embraced the event.

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Also participating was a Horse Drawn Funeral Carriage. Note the very stylish job on the horse’s hooves.

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The carriage had a mannequin complete with mask.

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Dia de Mertos was a fantastic event – I can’t wait for next November. Look for one in a city near you.

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