Chicago – October 2018 – Open House Part 4

Open House Chicago continues….

After finishing our tour of the Board of Trade Building we were a bit early for 111 West Jackson, as it didn’t open until 10 AM.

With our time we toured one of the best blocks in Chicago – South Dearborn between Jackson and Congress. The Fisher, Plymouth, Old Colony, Manhattan and Monadnock all are in the same general area

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All were built in the late 1800s and early 1900s with amazing detail.

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The streetlights in the area retain the classic look.

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Of all of them, the Monadnock is the most important. Built in 1891 it continues to this day at the largest load bearing brick building in the world.

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While the Fisher Building has these ornate cornices.

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The nearby Harold Washington Library adds some bling to the neighborhood.

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All of the buildings are worthy of close ups of the detail.

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The Chicago School of Architecture (a style – not a specific educational facility) was famous for it’s use of bay windows.

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Another cool street light.

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Views straight up show the detail underneath.

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My New York friend was stunned and amazed at the massive external fire escapes. Note that they were manufactured locally.

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Finally 111 West Jackson was open for viewing from their 25th floor outdoor deck.

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This deck offered a wide view of the south loop skyscrapers from the Willis/Sears Tower to Chase Tower (aka 10 South Dearborn).

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Over on Michigan Avenue we paid a return visit to the Railway Exchange Building.

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The lobby is vastly different as the Chicago Architecture Foundation has moved to a new location, and taken the model with them. Personally I think the lobby looks better without the model.

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On the upper floors we visited two different architectural firms.

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Both still feature the cool view of the 17 story atrium.

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As well as commanding views of the park and lake (along with some of the building detail just outside the window).

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A southeast view towards Grant Park.

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The skylights at the very top of the Railway Exchange Building.  An amazing building completed in 1904.

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The architecture firm on the 17th floor had some models displayed.

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The top floor is also known for the portals for windows.

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to be continued…..

 

 

Lancaster, Ohio – September 2018 – Frontier Spirit Festival

The city of Lancaster is one of the older towns in Ohio. The initial settlers came here in the late 1700’s, with the town itself being officially founded on November 10,1800.

Each year the Frontier Spirit Festival takes place. This festival has numerous actors who represent people who were instrumental in the settlement of the area in 1799.

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Pre dating Ohio becoming a state, the area was wilderness for the first settlers. The festival does an excellent job describing, and demonstrating what it took for these settlers.

The festival takes place in a large park at the south end of Lancaster. After an introduction, you are lead on a mile long hike with stops along the way for more detailed interpretations from the actors.

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The first large group of settlers came from Lancaster, Pennsylvania, thus the name. So many of those who came were of German descent that one of the first newspapers was a German language newspaper, Der Ohio Adler.

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All of the actors are volunteers. Their period clothing and other items, such as their guns add to the presentation.

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They spoke of the challenges in settling in the wilderness. There are more than 150 players in the group.

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Lancaster was founded by Ebenezer Zane, who was a famous merchant, trail blazer, pioneer and soldier. Zane was instrumental in treaties with the Native American’s (much debate about how equitable those treaties were, but that is another story).

Zane was given a contract by the United States government to open a road from Wheeling, West Virginia (then Virginia) to Maysville, Kentucky. In payment for this road he was given 3 square mile tracts of land at the crossing of the 3 major rivers – the Muskingum, the Hockhocking and the Scioto Rivers.

To make money he needed settlers to come buy some of this land, so he offer bounties to people to lead groups of settlers through the wilderness to each of the towns that developed. These leaders often were wanted by the law back east, so they were more than happy to move to the wilderness and earn some money.

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Anyone settling in the wilderness then had to fend for themselves, being hunters, building their cabins, becoming farmers, and generally having no dependency on anyone else.

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The promise of a better life in Ohio in 1799 was often not what they were lead to believe. This actress portrayed a frontier wife who wanted nothing more than to go back to Philadelphia and civilization.

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The husband and daughter wanted to make a life here. As with today, many marriages were strained by the stress of the move.

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This actress portrayed a young woman who was moving to the frontier to be married. She carried with her a dowry, a bag of salt.

The theme of this years presentation was about salt, and how important it was to the pioneers. They needed salt to cure their meat so it would last for long periods of time, as well as many other uses.

Salt was so rare, and in so much demand that in the Ohio frontier of 1799 it was worth more per ounce than gold.

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Along the way we met Johnny Appleseed, whose real name was John Chapman. All American school children know the story of Johnny Appleseed, who went from place to place scattering apple seeds for trees to grow,

Only that wasn’t quite how it was. John Chapman did indeed travel around to encourage the planting of fruit trees, but they were much more structured in orchards. He would plant the orchards then work with a local farmer to tend to the orchard, and share in the profits.

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There were numerous Native tribes in the area when it was being settled. Obviously not happy about losing their land with nothing in return, the local tribes tended to push back against the settlers.

Some tribes, such as the Wyandotte, had made deals with the US Government prior to 1799, thus allowing the development to continue faster.

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Our leaders into the wilderness.

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Once our tour down the trail was over, we visited the camp that was set up where they had a number of demonstrations.

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A band was playing.

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One tent had candle making – a very important item in pioneer life.

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Another musician with a zither.

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The Frontier Festival in Lancaster was far better than expected, with the actors and musicians all passionate about their presentation. It made for an entertaining and educational afternoon.

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New York City – September 2018 – Chrysler Building

The Chrysler Building is the most stylish skyscraper in New York City. Built in the late 1920s, it was for a few months the tallest building in the world – losing out to the Empire State Building once their construction completed.

To most, it is most famous for it’s ‘hood ornaments’, befitting a building built for a car company.

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Built in the classic art deco style, it appears to have perfect symmetry, but in reality the building is built in a trapezoid shape. This shape is a result of it being built on land that had been laid out along the path of the old Boston Post Road, which pre-dated the 1811 Manhattan Grid Plan.

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With a height over 1,000 feet it is the tallest brick building in the world.

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The 61st floor features eagles.

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In 1916 New York City enacted a ‘setback’ law. This law did not limit height, but required setbacks in the design to allow light and air to reach the streets below.

As a result many of the buildings built from then until the 1950s have a ‘wedding cake’ style to them.

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As noted previously the ‘gargoyles’ on the Chrysler Building are hood ornaments. The ones featured on the 31st floor are enlargements of the exact hood ornaments on the Chrysler automobiles of the day.

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The style and color of the ornaments blend perfectly with the lightly colored bricks.

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The crown is capped using ‘Nircosta’ stainless steel, as are the ornaments, window frames and needle.

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An entrance to the building continues the art deco theme.

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According to the documentation, the lobby is representative of German Impressionism.

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The lobby floors are massive pieces of African red granite, with Italian travertine in the elevator entrances.

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In addition to the travertine, the elevator lobbies have ornate wall designs.

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While many New York City landmarks won’t even let you in the lobby (talking to you Woolworth Building), visitors are welcome here, albeit only in the lobby.

The security guard did point out to me that we should wait for this specific express elevator to arrive and open as it has a unique interior.

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The ceiling has a large mural called ‘Transport and Human Endeavor’.

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A longer view of one of the elevator lobbies. There are 32 elevators in total.

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The lower level continues the art deco look, only in black.

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The Chrysler Building – One of the best.

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New York City – September 2018 – Grand Central Details

America’s greatest train station is Grand Central Terminal. While hundreds of thousands of people commute through the terminal every day, and nearly every tourist who comes to New York stops by, I had the opportunity (and the zoom) to check out close ups of some of the details.

The feature photo is a closeup of the clock and sculptures that are at the top of Grand Central facing south towards Park Avenue.

Let’s head inside.

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The iconic information kiosk clock backed by one of the schedule boards. The information kiosk is reached via an internal spiral staircase from the lower level of the terminal.

The clock was made by the Seth Thomas Clock Company. The clock has made appearances in numerous movies including North by Northwest, The Fisher King, the Godfather and others.

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The Beaux Arts Chandeliers frame the Main Concourse, with five on both the north and south side.

The bulbs have a basic look to them, but in reality they were replaced in 2009 with far more efficient fluorescent ones.

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Looking up from one of the lower level walkways you see a chandelier, skylights in the ceiling and the famed ceiling.

There are numerous photos on display in the terminal showing sunlight beaming through the side windows – something that is no longer possible because of the tall buildings surrounding GCT.

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Also in the lower level are some classic wooden benches. Before a restoration in the 1970s these benches were used for waiting passengers in the Main Concourse.

Since then, their primary use has been in the food court in the lower level, but others are in the corners of the lower level.

In addition the Springfield, Massachusetts train station recently installed some restored GCT wooden benches that were unused. They are currently on ‘permanent loan’ to Springfield, who restored them as part of the deal.

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While technically not in Grand Central Terminal, the Graybar Building has been closely associated with GCT since it’s construction in 1927.

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The building has the classic art deco mailboxes in the granite wall, as you walk through the GCT passage to Lexington Avenue (more on the Graybar Building later).

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Back in the Main Concourse one of the chandeliers accents the departure boards perfectly.

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The famous sky ceiling – 125 feet across and hung from steel trusses, the ceiling has 2,500 gold stars.

One of the earliest passengers in 1913 quickly figured out that the sky is ‘backwards’, on the ceiling east is on the west side of the concourse, and vice versa.

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Until the 1990s the grime was so bad the ceiling was barely noticeable. As a reminder they have left a black patch to show how dirty it was.

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A random look up shows amazing detail.

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GCT ‘hidden’ high up on one of the side walls.

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A ticket sellers window.

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Down in the lower level even the elevator lobbies have amazing detail.

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As do the track entrances.

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Heading out onto Lexington Avenue we see the main entrance to the Graybar Building. Note the giant reliefs on each side.

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Eagles are a recurring them in GCT, and the entire area.

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More detail on the exterior of the Graybar Building.

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The Graybar Rats – The sculpted rats are depicted as though they are climbing ropes that anchor a ship. In reality it is what is holding up the canopy over the entrance.

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Other canopy supports have more traditional artwork on them.

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Easily one of the most overlooked vintage New York Skyscrapers, the Graybar is worth spending some time looking up at.

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Another building that is closely associated with GCT is the Helmsley Building.

While not quite as famous as GCT’s clock facing south, the Helmsley clock greets the Park Avenue traffic coming from the north.

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This building too has numerous gargoyles and other sculptures throughout.

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More Helmsley Building detail.

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The former Postum Building at 250 Park Avenue is a prewar survivor where all the other buildings of it’s time (circa 1924) have long since been torn down and replaced with taller, newer giant glass boxes.

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Finally one last look at another of the famed GCT Eagles.

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Dayton – September 2018 – World War I Centennial Anniversary

With 1918 being the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I, the USAF Museum in Dayton held a commemoration in the form of a period correct air show.

While this air show occurs annually, the 100th anniversary brought special meaning to it.

 

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Many of the participants dressed in period clothing.

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Most of the aircraft present were in flying condition, although some are recreations and not original, 100 year old planes.

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Wright Patterson Air Force Base is huge, and could easily support the air show on a distant runway of the base.

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As with other events, the re-enactors added to the scene.

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Women were an essential part of the war effort as well, as represented by this Red Cross worker.

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Not really sure why so many of the men had on kilts though.

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A field hospital doctor with period medical pieces.

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There was constant flights occurring – these are actual model aircraft flying while the full size ones took a break.

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While they had nice paved runways, the period aircraft used the grass areas between the pavement for their movements.

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Ready to go…

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The Air Force base buildings also added to the atmosphere.

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Usually the skies over Dayton are filled with screaming jets, but on this day the sounds were very different with the piston engines taking flight.

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The building in the background house some of the museum’s 350+ aircraft.

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While there were no female pilots in World War I, this pilot was flying today.

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More of the aircraft ready to go.

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In addition, a number of aircraft were parked as static displays. The wooden propellers have a classic look to them.

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No ground crew needed, just pick up the tail of your plane and move it onto the runway.

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A number of the re-enactors were dressed as Germans.

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The leader of the Remote Control plane show was looking snazzy.

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More kilts?

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Time to fly…

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The models were very accurate in their representation.

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The Remote Control plane collection was quite large.

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In addition there were period automobiles. During the break from the full size aircraft, the automobiles took to the runways for a spin.

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Sometimes being chased by the model aircraft.

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A period ambulance.

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As with all things at the USAF Museum, the entire event was free to the public.

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Time to stop and move on to the next event.

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Across America – September – The Depot Tour Continues

The ongoing Train Depot/Station post continues to grow….

 

Manhattan – PATH station in the World Trade Center Oculus.

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The train to Hoboken

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Hoboken Terminal

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Jersey City – New Jersey Transit Light Rail – Newport Station

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Urbana, Ohio

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Columbus – near German Village – The High Street Streetcar Line Car House. Very nicely restored as a banquet facility.

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On this Sunday morning they were setting up for something – so the door was open 🙂

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Berea, Ohio Depot – Now a restaurant and tavern.

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The Berea Depot sits along two major rail lines, and the parking lot had a number of die hard Railfans hanging out to watch the freight trains go blowing by.  Apparently this spot in the best spot east of Chicago for those type of activities.

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While in nearby Olmstead Falls is a small depot that was also once located next door in Berea.

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It is part of a railroad themed shopping and entertainment complex.

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Elyria, Ohio is a medium sized city, so they had a larger station. It too has recently been restored.

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The Elyria station features some nice architectural touches.

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Amherst, Ohio Depot.

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As with many others it too is a community center.

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Oberlin, Ohio is home to to Oberlin College – the oldest co-educational college in America, and second oldest in the world.  It continues to be one of the highest ranked liberal arts colleges in America – in this tiny little northern Ohio town!

Their train depot is located in a small park.

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It is nice to see how many towns have retained these historic buildings.

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Just down the road in Wellington is the Lorain and West Virginia Railway Museum. While situated along the tracks, this depot was moved to the site.

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The museum offers rail excursions.

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The little town of New London, Ohio has a tiny little depot that has been moved to a local park.

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Our last stop of the day was in Galion, Ohio. We came upon this great Queen Anne style station that was open for a ‘Doors Open’ event.

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The station’s interior needs some work,  but it is standing and seemingly solid.

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The stone and brick building still features much of the canopy for waiting passengers.

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This station was home to the ‘Big Four’ railroad – that connected Cleveland, Cincinnati, Columbus & St Louis (they must have skipped Indiana).

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Outville, Ohio

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Johnstown, Ohio.

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On our Labor Day weekend throughout the Midwest we visit a few stations that were along the way.

Battle Creek, Michigan

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Three Oaks, Michigan – It is now an upscale clothing store in a tiny little tourist town.

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Ada, Ohio

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Forest, Ohio

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Chicago – Union Station (Interiors)

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Buffalo Central Terminal – There is a dedicated posting for this amazing station

https://rdzphotographyblog.com/2017/05/17/buffalo-may-2017-central-terminal/

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Jersey City – This station is at the dock for the ferries to the Statue of Liberty. Currently unused, it appears to be being restored as part of Liberty State Park

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Portland, Oregon

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St Louis – Union Station. Now a hotel and a shopping mall

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Philadelphia – 30th Street Station

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Boston – South Station

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Denver – Union Station. I understand it has been restored since this photo was taken.

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New York – Grand Central Terminal. I have amazingly few photos of this great terminal despite having been in and out of there numerous times.

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Pittsburgh – Pennsylvania Station. Now luxury apartments.

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The Amtrak station is connected, but in an ugly little building near the lower level

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Greensburg, Pennsylvania

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Latrobe, Pennsylvania

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Dennison, Ohio – This nice little station has been restored into a museum.

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Scranton, Pennsylvania – Steamtown National Historic Park has a great roundhouse that serves as the museum.

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Also in Scranton is an old station.

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Canon City, Colorado – The spectacular Royal Gorge Scenic Railroad station.

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Greeley, Colorado – Centennial Village Union Pacific Depot

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Bowling Green, Ohio Depot – now located at Dayton’s Carillon Park

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Glendale, Ohio – Now serves at the Visitor Center

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Dearborn, Michigan – Greenfield Village at the Henry Ford Museum.

A roundhouse

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Thurmond, West Virginia – Located in the New River Gorge National Park.

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Ironwood, Michigan

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Superior, Wisconsin

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Fargo, North Dakota

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Nelsonville, Ohio – Home of the Hocking Valley Scenic Railroad

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Elmore, Ohio – Another visitor center

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Bellville Depot – It has been restored and is now a rest stop along a ‘rails to trails’ path.

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A stylish clock is on the other side of the path, facing a great looking bridge.

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The overall scene of the Bellville depot.

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The town of Mt Vernon has two passenger depots and a former freight building. The first building was a Baltimore & Ohio depot.

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It actually sits along active tracks.

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Used by the local community development organization, it is beautifully restored inside and out.

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The second station, just a few blocks away is restored as well.

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A passenger station for the Pennsylvania Railroad, it closely resembles the B &O station. If you have ever wondered why some towns have ‘Union Stations’ it is because of this, why have 2 stations – have a ‘union’ of railroads and build one.

2018 08 25 183 Mt Vernon OH Depots.jpg

 

The tracks here have been converted to a rails to trails as well.

2018 08 25 184 Mt Vernon OH Depots.jpg

 

 

The interior is fantastic.

2018 08 25 192 Mt Vernon OH Depots.jpg

 

 

Even the heating radiators are stylish.

2018 08 25 191 Mt Vernon OH Depots.jpg

 

 

We arrived at Granville in the pouring down rain, so I took a couple photos out the car window. As with many of the others, it is a stop on a rails to trails.

2018 08 25 197 Granville OH Depot.jpg

 

 

Leaving the rain we stopped in the tiny town of Alexandria, where the station has been moved a mile or so from it’s original location to a parking lot of a business.

2018 08 25 204 Alexandria OH Depot.jpg

 

 

The next day we headed to western Ohio to the town of South Charleston. This depot had the best of both worlds, it was on a bike trail going one way and an active track going the other way.

2018 08 26 8 S Charleston OH Depot.jpg

 

 

Across the tracks was a park with a couple of cabooses.

2018 08 26 3 S Charleston OH Depot.jpg

 

 

The small city of London, Ohio was our next stop.

2018 08 26 13 London OH Depot.jpg

 

 

The station here was along unused tracks, and appears to be owned by a club. The building appears to have been restored, but the area around the building is a bit shabby.

2018 08 26 15 London OH Depot.jpg

 

 

As with most of the medium size stations there is some character to the architecture.

2018 08 26 21 London OH Depot.jpg

 

 

I had read that a depot from the southern Ohio town of Bainbridge had been moved to a place called Greene’s Museum Village, but when we found it, the place looked overgrown and someplace I didn’t want to go knock on a door – so a photo from across the corn fields sufficed.

2018 08 26 23 Orient OH Depot.jpg

 

 

Finally back in Columbus we unexpectedly passed by some remnants of the streetcar years. This unused building is just north of downtown and was the business offices for the streetcar company.

A streetcar barn had been located across the street but has been torn down years ago.

I can’t believe someone hasn’t restored this great building.

2018 08 26 74 Columbus Streetcar Houses.jpg

 

 

On the east side of Columbus, near Franklin Park is the Kelton Avenue streetcar barn. Actually this is the repair shop, the storage barns have been torn down here as well.

I have added the rest of the streetcar remnants to my list of places to go see, so stay tuned for more in the future.

2018 08 26 77 Columbus Streetcar Houses.jpg

 

 

The Brice Station served a small town just east of Columbus, now it is part of an events center on the northwest side of town.

2018 08 19 112 Columbus Brice Depot.jpg

 

 

We were lucky enough to meet a Reverend who was getting ready for his Sunday morning services. He was more than happy to let us look around the nicely restored station.

2018 08 19 118 Columbus Brice Depot.jpg

 

 

In the back they have a dining car, that still functions as a dining car – it just doesn’t move.

2018 08 19 123 Columbus Brice Depot.jpg

 

 

The counter is a work of art.

2018 08 19 124 Columbus Brice Depot.jpg

 

 

Our next stop is owned by the same people, only located across town. It is called the Golf Depot, and serves as the restaurant and clubhouse for the golf course.

2018 08 19 139 Gahanna Prospect Depot.jpg

 

 

I was immediately impressed with the views. Central Ohio is very flat and I was surprised that we were on a small rise, with a skyline view and a view of the nearby airport.

Where did this hill come from you ask? It was a huge landfill/garbage dump that they have re-purposed into this golf course. As with the last depot, the train never stopped here, since there were never any tracks anywhere close to here.

2018 08 19 136 Gahanna Prospect Depot.jpg

 

 

They do celebrate their rail history with a mural.

2018 08 19 142 Gahanna Prospect Depot.jpg

 

 

The depot was moved in tact and placed on the course.

2018 08 19 143 Gahanna Prospect Depot.jpg

 

 

The restaurant has all of the original wood.

2018 08 19 146 Gahanna Prospect Depot.jpg

 

 

We were having such good luck finding great little depots we headed 30 miles away to the small town of Sunbury, Ohio. I had read they too had a station, and a model train exhibit inside. Unfortunately the station was covered in some hideous faux shake shingles.

2018 08 19 160 Sunbury OH Depot.jpg

 

 

It was located where the tracks were, but are now gone. In it’s place is a very nice rails to trails path. I was disappointed in the depot, but the hike made up for it.

2018 08 19 162 Sunbury OH Depot.jpg

 

 

We continued back toward the city by stopping in the small city of Delaware, Ohio where the list said there were 2 stations very close to each other. The list was correct, there was this small wooden depot.

2018 08 19 173 Delaware OH Depots.jpg

 

 

Mostly hidden behind barbed wire fence.

2018 08 19 176 Delaware OH Depots.jpg

 

 

And a larger one across the tracks.

2018 08 19 168 Delaware OH Depots.jpg

 

 

That had warning signs of the hazardous conditions. So much for our good luck with finding cool little depots this day.

2018 08 19 167 Delaware OH Depots.jpg

 

 

This small depot is located the Mad River and Nickel Plate Railroad Museum in Bellevue, Ohio.

2018 05 19 156 Bellevue OH Mad River & Nickel Plate Railroad Museum.jpg

 

 

The small station serves as a display area for the museum.

2018 05 19 115 Bellevue OH Mad River & Nickel Plate Railroad Museum.jpg

 

 

Bucyrus, Ohio is currently restoring their fine brick station.

2018 05 19 7 Bucyrus OH.jpg

 

 

We are looking forward to a return visit when it is completed.

2018 05 19 9 Bucyrus OH.jpg

 

 

Newark’s is already restored and serves as an office for a local business.

2018 03 24 81 Newark OH Historic Jail Tour.jpg

 

 

While a nearby mural celebrates their rail history.

2018 03 24 66 Newark OH Historic Jail Tour.jpg

 

 

The small town of Canal Winchester (so named because the Ohio and Erie canal went through the town before the railroads) has two stations – this one if for the Interurbans (regional trains).

2017 05 07 176 Canal Winchester OH.jpg

 

 

It serves as a community center.

2017 05 07 177 Canal Winchester OH.jpg

 

 

On the other side of town is a small depot for the mainline trains.

2017 05 06 42 Canal Winchester OH.jpg

 

 

A small museum resides inside.

2017 05 06 43 Canal Winchester OH.jpg

 

 

With a couple of restored cars outside.

2017 05 06 49 Canal Winchester OH.jpg

 

 

The Marion station is one of the nicer ones. The exterior is in great shape, and the interior is not bad. A local rail fan club maintains the building.

2017 03 18 313 Marion OH Railroad Club Depot.jpg

 

 

Marion is located near multiple main freight lines and attract numerous rail fans.

2015 04 18 136 Marion OH Union Station.jpg

 

The building has a classic look.

2015 04 18 137 Marion OH Union Station.jpg

 

 

The nearby control tower oversees the activities.

2017 03 18 310 Marion OH Railroad Club Depot.jpg

 

 

In a Lima part there is a small depot called Lincoln Park. This small depot was located in a nearby town and moved to the park as part of the rail display.

2017 03 18 274 Lima OH Lincoln Park.jpg

 

 

It currently serves as offices for the park.

2017 03 18 276 Lima OH Lincoln Park.jpg

 

 

The Franklin County Fairgrounds is the home of the Hilliard Depot.

2016 07 23 130 Franklin County Fair.jpg

 

 

The National Road is more famous for automobile traffic, but this little depot served interurbans that eventually lost out to the cars.

2015 05 24 National Road in Ohio 138.jpg

 

 

Another small depot in the town of Pickerington.

2017 05 07 127 Fairfield County Covered Bridge Tour 2

 

 

Our last couple are more impressive stations. The Columbus and Toledo station on the near west side of Columbus is a great building with a pagoda look.

2015 05 25 National Road in Ohio 156.jpg

 

 

With the main Columbus station gone, it is fantastic that this one survived.

2015 05 25 National Road in Ohio 157.jpg

 

 

It currently serves as a union hall, but they rent it out for weddings and other events.

2015 12 09 169 Former Toledo & Central Ohio Station.jpg

 

 

Finally – Cincinnati Union Terminal.

2015 01 10  Cincinnati 121.jpg

 

 

On of the best domes in the world, it is mostly used for a number of museums that make their home there.

2015 11 14 178 Cincinnati Museum Center.jpg

 

 

But Amtrak does use a portion of the building.

2015 11 14 205 Cincinnati Museum Center.jpg

 

 

Easily one of the best train stations in America, the woodwork is stunning.

2015 11 14 200 Cincinnati Museum Center.jpg

 

 

Art deco at it’s finest. My plan is to update this posting as we visit more depots and stations around Ohio.

2015 11 14 203 Cincinnati Museum Center.jpg

 

 

 

 

Cassopolis, Michigan – September 2018 – Restored Gas Station Tour Continued

Cassopolis, Michigan – A Restored Sinclair Station

2018 09 02 223 Cassopolis MI Restored Sinclair Station.jpg

 

Previous trips:

Two stations in the same small Ohio town of Bucyrus. First up is a Sinclair Station.

2018 07 14 4 Bucyrus OH Restored Gas Stations.jpg

 

 

This station is next door to a repair shop owned by Carl. We stopped by at 7 AM on a Saturday morning and Carl was just opening his business up for the morning, and invited us in. Carl has a large collection of auto related items – so much in fact that the TV show American Pickers once paid him a visit.

2018 07 14 5 Bucyrus OH Restored Gas Stations.jpg

 

 

Just outside of town is a small restored Marathon station called ‘Mom and Pops’. We saw someone walking out of the driveway as we drove up and asked him it if the station was his. He replied no – but yelled at ‘Bob’ who was outside the house next door if it was ok if we took some photos. Bob yelled back ‘ yep thats what it is there for’.

2018 07 14 10 Bucyrus OH Restored Gas Stations.jpg

 

 

In the early days the stations were tiny little buildings, unless they did service.

2018 07 14 12 Bucyrus OH Restored Gas Stations.jpg

 

 

This station was well restored.

2018 07 14 13 Bucyrus OH Restored Gas Stations.jpg

 

 

As our weekend continued we found ourselves back in Plymouth, Indiana for a stop for dinner. We have previously visited this Mobil station, but in the rain. This gave us a chance to get some photos in better weather.

2018 07 16 322 Plymouth IN Restore Gas Station.jpg

 

 

And the time warp gas station travel continued.

2018 07 16 324 Plymouth IN Restore Gas Station.jpg

 

 

On our way home from Pittsburgh we stopped in Steubenville at a auto repair shop that is actually a fully restored Sohio station.

When John Rockefeller had grown Standard Oil to be a monopoly the government forced them to break up – as a result there were a number of Standard Oil companies in different states (not a full list):

Standard Oil of New Jersey – Esso, which became Exxon

Standard Oil of New York – Socony, which became Mobil

Standard Oil of California – Socal, which became Chevron

Standard Oil of Indiana – Stanolind, which became Amoco

Standard Oil of Ohio – Sohio. In the 1980s BP bought Sohio and converted all the stations to BP.

2018 07 08 348 Steubenville OH.jpg

 

There are many people who are collectors of ‘petroliana’, old gas station items. Barry Robb must have been one of those people. According to their website Barry was an assistant manager of a former owner, and he took over the station in 1986, operating it as a BP station.

In 2011 their agreement with BP ran out. They restored the look of the original Sohio station, and continued in business as a repair shop only (as well as a museum).

As a side note Sunset and Wilshire looks nothing like the one in California, but still a nice neighborhood.

2018 07 08 351 Steubenville OH.jpg

 

 

Out front is a collection of pumps from various eras.

2018 07 08 349 Steubenville OH.jpg

 

 

While inside (it was closed this day – photos taken through the glass) is a collection of smaller items.

2018 07 08 359 Steubenville OH.jpg

 

 

Interestingly next door is a modern gas station/mini mart.

2018 07 08 358 Steubenville OH.jpg

 

 

 

After checking out my photos I realized that we have recently came across 3 fully restored stations, and all 3 times we had the same car with us.

2016 11 11 34 Winston Salem NC.jpg

 

 

This spectacular Shell station is in Winston Salem, North Carolina.

2016 11 11 30 Winston Salem NC.jpg

 

 

Today it serves as a tourist information center.

2016 11 11 31 Winston Salem NC.jpg

 

 

Shaped like a giant scallop shell, it is the last of a handful that a local oil company owner had built in the 1930s.

2016 11 11 32 Winston Salem NC.jpg

 

 

Another restored gas station – another shot with the GTI in it. This one is a Mobil station in Plymouth, Indiana.

2016 10 16 3 Plymouth IN.jpg

 

 

To add to their atmosphere they have a restored police car in the parking lot.

2016 10 16 1 Plymouth IN.jpg

 

 

Much like the Sohio station in Steubenville their interior has a collection of smalls for Mobil.

2016 10 16 4 Plymouth IN.jpg

 

 

They also have a restored tow truck.

2016 10 16 6 Plymouth IN.jpg