El Paso – September 2022 – Views from Above

The road that runs along a small mountain just north of downtown El Paso provides scenic views has the appropriate name of ‘Scenic Drive’.

From here you can easily see most of El Paso, and across the border to Juarez.

The houses on top of the hill appear to be the most expensive in town.

The overlooks provide a panoramic view of downtown El Paso, as well as the mountains behind Juarez.

The Manhattan Heights neighborhood below is accented by a large collection of cypress trees rising above.

A close up of the neighborhoods on both sides of the border.

This giant red X is a sculpture in Juarez that is (according to most) intended to symbolize the combination of Spanish and Native cultures.

With the glass eye in the center it also is thought to represent the Aztec symbol Nahui Ollen, for balance in the universe.

So much for balance.

Meanwhile back up on the hill is this large home with their own Statue of Liberty, visible from the border. You can’t get close enough to see if it has the famed inscription on it.

Boquillas, Mexico – May 2019 – Crossing the Rio Grande

The small Mexican town of Boquillas was for many years a mining town, until that ended in 1919. Fortunately for Boquillas it lies directly across the Rio Grande from Big Bend National Park.

This worked great for years, with tourists crossing the border to go up into town for lunch, then returning to the park. All that ended with 9-11, and the border closings.

For more than 10 years the small town dwindled down to almost nothing, until finally the US Government built a remote immigration center and the flow started again.



The border crossing is only open on Friday, Saturday, Sunday and Monday, but our good luck had us there on a Sunday so we headed across the river in a rowboat.



The ‘Park and Ride’ lot on the Mexican side was where we picked up our ‘ride’ into town – a burro.



The townsfolk have this worked out – the family own some burros, and they walk along with you as you ride up the 1/2 mile hill into town, where they take you to their family owned restaurant. (there are two restaurants in town).

The food and cold beer were excellent.



After lunch they showed us around town, stopping off at his wife’s souvenir stand where we picked up something.



Their little town is resourceful. With a church and a school, they have everything they need to survive 160 miles from the nearest town in Mexico.




They do make trips across to the Rio Grande Village in the park to pick up needed supplies.

We continued our tour around town. While there are a few abandoned buildings, most are in use.















We stopped at the Park and Ride lot in town for our trip back down the hill.



A quick ride across the Rio Grande, followed by a brief visit to US immigration and we were on our way – full from lunch and with great memories of a cool little Mexican town.






Langtry, Texas – May 2019 – Views of a (Mostly Former) Town

Langtry, Texas is a town in west Texas, but just barely. In the early 1900s it was a busy place as they built the railroad nearby. Today it is a post office and the Judge Roy Bean Visitor Center (detailed on another posting).



Most of the buildings in the area have been abandoned.















Those that remain have a sense of humor, as evidenced by a sign pointing toward the Rio Grande that says ‘Mexico’ this way.





The town does have a beautiful view of the Rio Grande Valley, and the cliffs and caverns across in Mexico.









And with that we took the lonely road west.