Los Glaciares National Park, Argentina – January 2020 – Cruising for Ice

One of the more popular activities at Los Glaciares National Park is to take a 5 hour cruise to see the glaciers beyond Perito Moreno.





The cruise left the port and headed north across Lago Argnetino.





It wasn’t long before we saw icebergs.









































The cruise took us past a number of dramatic glaciers including Spegazzini – the largest in the park. All were impressive in their own way.

























































With one last look at Perito Moreno Glacier we headed back to port, and ended our ice adventures.





The entire crew, especially the hostess Victoria, provided great service with an education on the glaciers.





A Gourmet Glacier Cruise – Muy Bien.







Rio De La Plata, Argentina – January 2020 – A Day on the River

The Rio De La Plata is considered by some as the widest river in the world, at between 30 and 80 miles wide. Others consider it either a bay or estuary. Regardless it is a busy place on a sunny summer day.

The delta beyond the city of Tigre have no roads, but numerous houses and restaurants. Their only way to receive supplies is via the grocery boats.





The boats that take people out to the islands often have to store the larger items on the roof.





Meanwhile a load of bamboo comes to town.





On a day like this there are literally hundreds of sailboats on the water all along the shoreline.





The windsurfers are amazingly fast.






While many just hung out on their boat.






The San Isidro Cathedral and a nice sailboat.





For most of the 30 miles of shoreline from Buenos Aires to Tigre is lined with tall apartment buildings.






The newer sailors in the school sometimes struggle, but stayed upright.





Leaving a nice line of small matching sailboats.





This guy was amazing flying along just above the water.






There are many very shallow areas that give a strange perspective in the middle of the river – such as the people walking seemingly in the middle of the water.





The troubadour boat 🙂






Great lighting, great sailboat.





Where are we – oh yeah – Argentina.





On the narrower part of the river near Tigre there was a mass of various craft.





The far side of the river have large grasses.






The wooden sailboats have a wonderful look.










The Parque de la Costa (Coast Park) has more than 30 rides and attractions.









The return trip had a few more great watercraft.













It was a great day on the Rio De La Plata.







Lago Nahuel Huapi, Argentina – December 2019 – Tour of the Lake

When we arrived in Bariloche numerous people insisted we take a lake tour. We were fortunate enough to get some tickets as we were leaving town for the North Loop tour, but they were for that afternoon.

After arriving back in town, we headed straight for Puerto Pañuelo to catch the ship Modesta Victoria for our extended tour of Lago Nahuel Huapi. The Modesta Victoria is over 80 years old!










The warm, but somewhat windy day, was perfect for the cruise.




As we left the port we passed by some very impressive buildings.







As a glacial lake, it is completely surrounded by mountains.







Not long after leaving the port a flock of seagulls started to trail the boat. People quickly realized if they threw bread or crackers they would follow.

Some were able to get the seagulls to take the crackers directly from their hands, but this poor lady tried forever and was never able to.








After an hour we arrived at our first stop, the Arrayanes National Park. An Arrayane is the type of tree seen here. The slow growing tree is not native to this location, but a property owner in the early 1900s introduced them. Sadly many of them are dying off.













Our second stop was on Isla Victoria.







We returned to the port in the late afternoon sun.









Marietta, Ohio – September 2019 – Sternwheeler Festival

In the early days of river transportation a common style of boat was the sternwheeler. With it’s distinctive large wooden wheel on the back (stern) to propel it, it was a common sight along the Ohio River.

Today most of the sternwheels are mostly decorative, with a traditional propeller providing most of the propulsion. The boats at the Marietta Sternwheeler Festival were mostly campers on boats.


































New York City – August 2019 – Circling Manhattan

With a trip for work to New York City I had little time for sightseeing, but my wife didn’t! This is her photo blog of a 4 hour New York Architectural Society (almost) circumnavigation of Manhattan. I say almost, since there was a bridge on the Harlem River in a down position so they had to backtrack back around.

They set sail from a pier in Chelsea.



And headed for the harbor…





Passing by Jersey City…



The trip was actually offered for college credit, so there was an instructor on board whom reportedly spoke ‘constantly’. The trip took them past Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty, which I wouldn’t think would need any dialog to explain.





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It was time to head up the East River…



This carousel in a park in Brooklyn came from a defunct amusement park in my hometown of Youngstown, Ohio.



Nearby was a jet ski school!



As you make you way up the East River you go past many areas that are undergoing gentrification.



An interesting view of Roosevelt Island, and the 59th Street (Queensboro) Bridge.



The United Nations Building



Roosevelt Island was once home to a Tuberculosis Hospital, but now is home to thousands in new apartment buildings.



A great view of the bridge and the Roosevelt Island Tram.



A series of bridges on the far end of the East River, where they ended up turning around.



If you have plenty of money ($850 one way for a 30 minute plane ride) you can get from Manhattan to the Hamptons in a hurry on a seaplane.



Or a helicopter…



The cruise continued back down the East River




The late afternoon sun made a interesting view of the Staten Island Ferry with the statue in the background.



The World Trade Center from the Hudson River



One of the many New York Waterway ferries.



Finally some interesting new architecture along the Hudson.

I think you will agree her photos were great – I am so jealous I had to work, it looks like it was a great cruise 🙂





Cambridge, Massachusetts – August 2019 – Insider Tour of MIT

I am fortunate enough to know someone who has spent considerable time at MIT, and she was kind enough to show us around to sights on campus that most visitors don’t realize is there to be seen.

We started out with some familiar sites; the Kresge Auditorium. Designed and completed in the mid 1950s by Eero Saarinen, it is an excellent example of mid-century modern.






Next door is a chapel, also designed by Saarinen.






The Rogers Building serves as the center of MIT. It’s atrium is beautiful.



The windows facing Mass Avenue are equally impressive.




The Frances Russell Hart Nautical Museum is tucked away on an upper floor of the main building. It contains a number of intricately designed model ships.






As you wander the halls you come across all sort of great sights.



















While this might look like any other hallway at MIT, it is very special. It is known as the Infinite Hall, running the length of the main building and leading to a second building.

You have heard of Stonehenge, perhaps Manhattanhenge (a posting is available), and even Carhenge.

This otherwise nondescript hallway twice a year is the location of MITHenge – the sun shines straight through the entire distance, lighting up the floor. I need to come back in November!




The outdoor space is enhanced with sculptures. MIT is a very cool place, and thanks to an insider we saw some cool sights (all completely open to anyone, you just need to know where to look).