People From Around the World

When I started this blog a few years ago I did so to share my photos with family and friends. Little did I realize it would become so popular that I would’ve passed 100,000 visitors in it’s history.

Thank you to all who have stopped by to check out the photos. I am looking forward to many more years of sharing.

Since people have made this blog I thought I would share some of my favorite photos of people.

Up first is a Rosenmontag Parade in Trier, Germany. Apparently this person was parodying a French Army soldier (so I was told, could be wrong).

While checking out the geysers in Yellowstone National Park this person felt compelled to walk out in front of everyone and say ‘All Hail the Geyser Gods’

An elderly couple at an Italian Festival in Columbus, Ohio.

The key to their marriage is fire eating.

Even warriors need to share child care duties.

The next two come from the same Renaissance Festival in Cincinnati.

Would you trust a total stranger to shove a knife down your throat?

The Johnny Depp look alike winner.

When a big guy in a kilt asks to pose for a photo you oblige.

Two people, one furry because – well it is Furry Time in Pittsburgh.

A Powwow participant.

You can’t beat the Twins Day Parade in Twinsburg, Ohio for people watching. These two ladies married identical twins and have had children who share DNA that resembles siblings instead of cousins, as they have achieved some notoriety in the national press.

Krampus!

A subway station in Manhattan has more than 100 of these cool little statues scattered all over the place. This person was peddling some alternate newspaper as I went to take a photo of the statues.

The look of him making eye contact with the statue is fantastic.

A 1940s celebration in Cincinnati included a Rosie the Riveter contest.

Halloween Highball in Columbus

A Kona Hawaii coffee festival include dancers.

Embassy Open House in Washington DC.

Parade the Circle in Cleveland is always a great photo op.

Gaucho Festival in San Antonio de Areco, Argentina.

A Palace Guard at the Presidential Palace in Buenos Aires. Thrilled to pose for yet another photo.

Sonoita, Arizona – In the middle of field in the middle of nowhere we came across a group of people enjoying their own mediaeval times, complete with a mediaeval dog.

Día de Los Muertos in Tucson..

Thanks to those 100,000 people who have stopped by over the years.

Elgin, Arizona – April 2023 – Flying Leap Vineyards

The area around Willcox, Elgin and Sonoita Arizona have a climate and soil conditions similar to California and Argentina, as they are over 5000′ in elevation resulting is ‘not as hot’ a climate. As a result there are more than 15 wineries in Sonoita and Elgin alone, and another 14 in Willcox.

We stopped by the Flying Leap Vineyard near Elgin for some tasting and a tour. While it is too early for the grapes to be growing, it is still a picturesque setting.

Not only does Flying Leap make wine, they also make spirits, and the nice people at Flying Leap showed me around.

The facility has separate tasing rooms for the spirits and the wines.

You are more than welcome to wander around the facility.

They are very dog friendly!

While there are many tasting rooms in the area, a stop at Flying Leap is highly recommended.

Sonoita, Arizona – August 2022 – From Ranching to Renaissance

After our visit to the Empire Ranch house, we continued to wander the dusty roads to check out the sights. Imagine our surprise when we came across a group of Renaissance Cosplay people.

This event was not one of the more structured Renaissance Festivals that tour the country, rather this is a group of people who like to get dressed up and spend the weekend living in the renaissance period.

After checking with some people near the entrance they assured me we were more than welcome, and that they would be thrilled to have photos taken of them. Say no more!

Sonoita, Arizona – August 2022 – Empire Ranch

In the high grasslands of Southern Arizona lies the Empire Ranch. This ranch at it’s largest covered 180 square miles, larger than the city of Philadelphia. While there are still some cattle still on the land, it is mostly a nature preserve.

Located between the Whetstone Mountains and the Santa Rita Mountains, the land lies at 5000′ in elevation, providing enough rain for the grassy fields to support the cattle.

In addition the Cienega Creek runs through the ranch, providing nearly year round water.

It is not normally this green, Southern Arizona has had an active monsoon season, and everything now is very green.

The original homestead is maintained by a non profit group called the Empire Ranch Foundation. Among other things they maintain the house, and additional buildings.

The home, as well as most of the buildings, is built out of adobe and wood. Many have had a skim of stucco added later.

Inside the ranch house, and attached other buildings, there is a collection of items from when the ranch was active including a butter churn, cowboy spurs and other items.

This view shows evidence of the original adobe walls.

With the green grass, and the old outbuildings, it felt as though you were in the midwest, as long as you ignored the 7000′ to 9000′ mountains in the distance.

This structure is known as the saddle drying barn.

One final look at another of the old adobe buildings before we head off to the next adventure….

Vail, Arizona – December 2021 – Views From The New Neighborhood

Our move to Arizona has found us living in a town called Vail, at the far east end of Tucson. It predates the same named town in Colorado by about 100 years, but for most of it’s time was a small, dusty railroad stop. The Colorado town has nothing on the Arizona one, the mountains here have more vertical gain above the town – just without so much snow (thankfully).

In the last 30 years it has grown tremendously but still has that ‘outpost’ feel, being at the edge of town, next to the mountains and desert. This posting has random views of some sights around Vail and beyond.

While Route 66 is the most famous east-west route in the pre interstate days, in reality more people actually took U.S. 80 west to California. This route made it’s way across Southern Arizona, including a portion between Benson and Vail, on it’s way to Tucson.

U.S. 80 crosses Cienega Creek on a 1921 bridge, next to where two Southern Pacific railroad routes also traverse the creek. A cienega is a wetland unique to the Southwestern U.S., resulting in a landscape unlike the surrounding area because of the constant availability of water, with large trees lining the banks.

Just to the east is the ghost town of Pantano, another railroad stop in the late 1800s, early 1900s. Today only the water tower remains.

About 30 miles south of Vail is the town of Sonoita. As you cross the Empire Mountains the landscape changes yet again, with large fields of tall grasses, instead of the Sonoran Desert look of Vail.

A local propane dealer has a cool collection of decorated tanks.

While Saguaro National Park East has a Tucson address, it is in the Vail area. It was a good day to take the dog for a walk, and take a closer look at the cacti.

The Vail area, and all of Southern Arizona, have spectacular sunsets.

Note the full moon peeking through the clouds.