Buenos Aires – December 2019 – Belgrano Barrio

Today’s tour is of the Belgrano neighborhood. Belgrano was originally a town of it’s own, but it became part of the city of Buenos Aires in 1887.

Today it is one of the nicer neighborhoods in the city.




There is a small, but lively Chinatown in the neighborhood.










There is a Buddhist Temple in an otherwise nondescript building.




The Parque Barrancas de Belgrano covers a 3 block area, including some magnificent trees.







A large gazebo known as La Glorieta, where numerous dances occur on a weekly basis.





Amazingly a Statue of Liberty that is older than the one in New York, albeit much smaller.




A mosaic on an apartment building.




Manuel Belgrano




The Immaculate Conception Church.










The Museo Historico Sarmiento.










And another beautiful sunset ends our great weekend.






San Isidro, Argentina – December 2019 – A Quiet Sunday

Argentina has a tradition where everyone decorates for Christmas on the same day. We happened to choose that day to go to San Isidro to look around. The result was a very quiet city, but one with some nice architecture.

We took the Tren De La Costa (Train of the Coast) up. While billed as a tourist train, it seemed like any other train, only smaller.







A walk through a mostly empty park to the riverside gave us a view of a few vintage cars.




The highlight of San Isidro is the cathedral.













The area around the cathedral has some interesting buildings.



















Eventually we gave up and went to another quiet train station for the ride home. Ciao San Isidro.






Brooklyn – September 2019 – A Day at the Beach

A sunny Sunday in the city – a perfect time to go to Coney Island.



Even though it was warm the beach was almost vacant.



As was the boardwalk.




A perfect time to stop for some Nathan’s Hot Dogs.



Back on the boardwalk we met a zombie baseball team.



There is currently a large collection of very unique murals on walls placed around a common space. The artists came from all over the world.













It was time to get back on the train to Manhattan….




But not before stopping at the Brighton Beach station where the MTA museum was running a number of vintage trains.







A great way to spend a few hours at the beach – Brooklyn style.






Buenos Aires – August 2019 – Retiro Train Station Tour

A quiet Saturday morning was a great time to take a guided tour of Retiro Station – in Spanish!



The station actually is comprised of 3 separate terminus’. The largest and most grand is Retiro Mitre, named for the line that terminates there.



The center concourse has an excellent vaulted ceiling.



Nearly all of the trains departing from here are commuter rail, so they come and go frequently. It is easily one of the busiest in South America (but not so much on a Saturday morning).







Why are we outside a Burger King?



And why is our tour all looking up?



At this amazing skylight in the middle of Burger King. Obviously it used to be a much more grand restaurant than Burger King, but at least they have retained it.



The second, much smaller terminal is Retiro Belgrano.





The final is Retiro San Martin – graced by a statue of the father of Argentina, General San Martin.



They have kept a great old schedule board.



But it is time to kiss this place goodbye.





Buenos Aires – June 2019 – Views of the City

It was a great 10 days in Buenos Aires. I am not certain what I was expecting but whatever it was, BA exceeded it!

The Nueve de Julio Avenue is the center of the city. Created in the 1930s by wiping out an entire city block wide, and nearly 3 miles long, it is an impressive sight.



The city exists because of the huge estuary of the Rio de La Plata, creating one of the world’s great ports.



The city is full of great architecture starting with the Retiro Train Station.





The Torre Monument is in the plaza in front of Retiro. The tower was completed in 1916 by the same architect who built Big Ben.



Just down the street is the Kavanagh Building, an Art Deco masterpiece.



One of the highlights of the city is the number of ‘Palacios’ remaining from the early 1900s. While there were once more than 100, less than 40 remain, but those that still stand are magnificent.













In addition to the Palacios there are literally hundreds, if not thousands, of impressive buildings.

















The city was the first city in South America to have a subway, starting over 100 years ago.





As with any city, not all are enjoying the good life. Buenos Aires has some ‘Villa’s, basically shantytowns for the very poor. The city says they have a plan to help improve the lives of the people living in the Villas, but only time will tell.



No visit to Buenos Aires is complete without a stop at the Obelisk.



For now it is time to fly, but not before joining the crowd to watch a soccer game while waiting on the plane. True Buenos Aires!






New York City – June 2019 – Different Ways to Get Around Town

On the ground, on the water, or in the air there are many ways to get around the city.

Let’s start with a city bus. Not just any bus, but a collection of historic buses from the MTA Museum:











Via the water…









Always a favorite – the Roosevelt Island Tram.



Or the train…



For now it is time to get out of town – over the swamps of Jersey.






Across America – May 2019 – Random Scenes Part 1

The following are interesting scenes that didn’t fit any of the other postings.

Lajitas, Texas – The only place to stay was a golf resort, but it had a great sunset.




Texas border area – We saw a few instances of the border patrol in action, including going through 2 checkpoints along the highway. Strangely the checkpoints were at least 40 miles from the border.





Marfa, Texas – This town is an artist enclave for New York artists. How and why a bunch of New York artists decided to go to a small west Texas town is far too long for this blog.




Fort Davis, Texas is a historic town with a former frontier fort. Today it has a couple of cool re purposed buildings.





Pecos, Texas – For about 100 miles in any direction from Pecos were new fracking oil wells. The landscape was filled with these towers burning off natural gas, as well as truck traffic jams and RVs parked in the desert for the workers. The high pay also caused our most expensive hotel night in Carlsbad, New Mexico as the demand for housing far exceeds supply.









Roswell, New Mexico – While I have a posting for the UFO industry of Roswell, there was also a very cool airplane ‘boneyard’.







Portales, New Mexico – When we were driving into town the billboard for Burger King said ‘next to the airplane’. They weren’t kidding.



Hereford, Texas – Beef capital of the world. I think they are correct.





Canyon, Texas – A Giant Cowboy



Amarillo, Texas – Much cleaner energy source.



Canadian, Texas – Lonesome train blues.



Near Shattuck, Oklahoma – Folk Art along the Highway.





Fairview, Oklahoma – We were looking for some Good Eats, but needed to find somewhere else.



Jet, Oklahoma – One of our disappointments was being unable to check out the Salt Plains National Refuge – where you can dig around for crystals in the salt flats. Much of Oklahoma was flooded, and it flooded the salt flats.

The cows however were making the most of their new beach.





Somewhere in Oklahoma – The Perfect Farm Photo

Part 2 in a second posting.